The WordPress Photography Podcast https://www.imagely.com/ The podcast for photographers looking to learn and do more with their WordPress photography websites. Conversations tailored to making WordPress more than just a tool and more of a part of your photography business. Tue, 14 Jul 2020 14:31:04 +0000 en-US © Imagely - Podcast Episodes are Property of Imagely. WordPress is a trademark of The WordPress Foundation. Making WordPress Easy For Photographers Imagely episodic The podcast for photographers looking to learn and do more with their WordPress photography websites. Conversations tailored to making WordPress more than just a tool and more of a part of your photography business. Imagely admin@imagely.com clean https://www.imagely.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/podcast.jpg The WordPress Photography Podcast https://www.imagely.com/ Episode 107 – How to write better words for your photography site with Kimberley Anderson https://www.imagely.com/podcast/107/ Thu, 02 Jul 2020 13:00:00 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=51442 full 107
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Kimberley Anderson is the voice behind Red Curl Creative, a copywriting service for photographers and wedding professionals. A reformed wedding photographer from Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Kim hung up her camera after a 20-year run, vowing never to eat saucy chicken on a Saturday again, and dusted off her English degree.

Now she’s the voice behind Red Curl Creative, a done for you copywriting service, and she also teaches photographers and other wedding pros how to write more effectively on their websites, blogs, and social media with her course Write Better Words.

She believes very few people are the terrible writers they think they are, and she helps them find the words to attract better clients!

Joke of the day:

What do you call a photo taken by a cat?

A paw-trait.

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What we discuss:

  • Don’t ignore the woo-woo work. If you don’t know who you are speaking to, you can’t write effectively.
  • For websites, don’t write within the template.
  • Hate typing? Have trouble finding the words? Use voice to text with Google or Word.
  • Repurpose blogs!  Blogging is great for SEO, for authority but they can also be used for social media
  • The power of testimonials

Where to find Kim:

Referenced Links:

Shoutout

A Podcast That Goes The Distance - Scott presents issues and topics in this podcast that are both interesting and important for photographers. And they do so with style and substance. It's one of my favorite podcasts and I highly recommend you listen to them.

Connecticut Headshots

Transcription:

Transcription was done by Rev.com, using their AI (artificial intellegence) generated transcript. The transcript may contain spelling, grammar, and other errors, and is not a substitute for watching the video or listening to the episode.

Scott:
What do you call a photo taken by a cat, a paw-trit. Welcome to episode 107. My name is Scott Wyden Kivowitz and I'm joined by my guest, Kimberly Anderson. Kimberly Anderson is the voice behind Red Curl Creative, a copywriting service for photographers and wedding professionals. A reformed wedding photographer from Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Kim hung up her camera after a 20 year run vowing, never to eat saucy chicken on a Saturday, again, and dusted off her English degree. Now she's the voice behind Red Curl Creative, a done-for-you copywriting service. And she also teaches photographers and other wedding pros how to write more effectively on their websites, blogs, and social media with her course Write Better Words, which we'll be talking about today. She believes very few people are terrible writers, or as terrible writers as they think they are. And she helps them find the words to attract better clients. Now, Kimberly wrote her bio, which I basically just read to you and I stumbled a little bit, but I'm not the best reader, so it happens. But you can tell she writes pretty well. So if I read it better...

Kimberly:
That's all right. We're not hiring you for your voiceover work. It's all right.

Scott:
That's true. That's true. I've always thought about getting into voiceover though. Because I feel like it'd be fun.

Kimberly:
Yeah.

Scott:
Don't you think it would be fun to do that?

Kimberly:
Yeah. I do. Yeah. I do.

Scott:
I feel like the people who do that probably have some of the most fun. The bloopers and stuff are probably so much so great to listen to.

Kimberly:
Yeah.

Scott:
Yeah. So what's going on with you, Kim. I'm glad that I got you on here. We've got a lot to talk about. And so what's going on with you?

Kimberly:
Well, I'm just living the dream over here in Milwaukee, Scott. Teaching people how to write better words, doing things for photographers and wedding pros. Just basically trying to help people get over their fear of putting words down on virtual paper. That's what I'm all about.

Scott:
Yeah. The ad image that we always come up... have people come to us and say, what should I change the dummy content to, and things like that? So we're going to get into topics about this stuff. And so let's just dive right in.

Kimberly:
Sure.

Scott:
When it comes to writing the words on your photography sites, it's super important to get it right. But getting it right isn't always that obvious. So can you talk a bit about what you should think about when writing effective copy? I'm pretty sure you'd to call this woo woo work.

Kimberly:
It is woo woo work. You can't skip the woo. I say that all the time. And the woo woo work is that tapping into who exactly you're talking to. I find a lot of times the people that struggle the most with copy on their website is they don't know who they're talking to. I mean, they know what kind of clients they want, but they haven't drilled down and they haven't done the hard work to figure out exactly who they want to appeal to. And there's a couple reasons for that. Sometimes it's, they want to appeal to everyone, which is never a good idea. This just really dilutes your copy. And sometimes it's they're scared to make people go away. They want the opportunity to talk to everyone, which makes sense. But there's a fine line between repelling people you don't want and stating what you do. So the people who hire you are very clear about what you do.

Scott:
Yeah. And I feel like in a way, and a pretty important way, at that is, if you're someone like me, that's a dad. Right? And your target market, maybe it's family portraits, but maybe your target market is not the mom in the family, but actually the dad. Right?

Kimberly:
Right. Yeah.

Scott:
And maybe your ideal client is a very masculine dad. Right? So the words you write may not be lighter tone. They may not be on the more feminine side. It might be that you're writing in a way that really a very masculine dad would connect with. Right?

Kimberly:
For sure. Like, yeah. Say if you had that type of person and that was your ideal client or the people you worked with the most, something like military animals comes to mind with this. What do they want? They want the facts. They want to know, how long is this going to take? How are you going to make this easy for me? It's a very, very different audience that you're writing to than the mom that wants the family portraits to hang on the walls. I mean that dad is probably going to want to know what exactly should I wear. He's going to have a lot of questions that are very drilled down and less esoteric than the mother. And if you're writing to the mother, he's not going to connect with that.

Scott:
It's funny you brought the military thing. I've never thought about military families specifically being a target audience, which obviously they totally can. And I'm sure they are too many photographers, but I write for military people.

Kimberly:
Oh. Do you? Okay.

Scott:
Yeah. Because the way that you describe it, it's true. They're very matter of fact. And I'm that way as well. So I naturally tend to write way more than I need to, to detail every aspect of things.

Kimberly:
Yeah. Very common. Yep.

Scott:
So, yeah. Yeah. Wow. That's so interesting. Okay. Yeah. This is great already. Most web designs, WordPress themes and whatnot, all come with some sort of dummy content, which I just mentioned a little earlier in the show. It's a placeholder. I mean, Imagely themes, photo karate themes, ProPhoto flow themes, they all come with these placeholder content for the site owners to then fill in with our own copy.

Kimberly:
Right.

Scott:
But people aren't bound to the paragraph here and there, or the three bullet points. They can add five bullet points. Right?

Kimberly:
They can.

Scott:
They're not bound to that. Right. So can you talk about your suggestions, your thoughts about placeholder dummy content versus what photographers should be doing?

Kimberly:
Sure. So this is something that is fascinating to me. Just because you're creative and you're a great photographer doesn't mean that, that translates into the written word. And you can be creative in one part of your brain and not in the other. Way back when I was in photo school, I took a sketch course, and I was so excited about this course because I thought, well, I'm a photographer. Right? I'm artistic. I like to take photos. I like to draw. I like... I just assumed. And I was terrible at it. It was a completely different dimension for me. So going back to the Laura Ipsen, when you open up a theme and you start typing into that theme, what's happening is, if you are not used to writing a lot, your brain shuts down. It sees here's this little space that's got room for four sentences and three bullet points.

Kimberly:
And that's what I have to put there. And that's not at all the case. You're going to laugh at me for saying this, but themes lie to you when it comes to copy. So you really need to write that stuff outside of your template. I encourage people to write as much as they can in a Word doc or a Google doc, whatever you're happy with. Write in chunks, and then start moving those chunks into your website. And there might be parts that you don't use on, say on your homepage. It's starting to be a little crowded, but you have this paragraph that you really like where you're explaining something. Well, that's great. Just move it to your FAQs. I mean, there's lots of different ways you can do the copy and people get very drilled down into the fact that if I'm writing on the homepage, I've got these spots to fill. And you do not have to.

Scott:
Right. It's so true. One thing that Imagely does is we actually fill it in with actual, albeit they might be short, but we'll fill it in with a short bio that's a made up thing. We won't use the actual, Laura [inaudible 00:09:10] nonsense that doesn't make any sense, but it's still the same thing where we're kind of telling you three lines is your paragraph. When in reality it could be how ever very long you want it to be.

Kimberly:
It could be. Yeah. Yeah.

Scott:
Yeah.

Kimberly:
It just really stifles your creativity when you have to write inside the template.

Scott:
Yep. Yeah. I personally like to write in either Google docs and use Grammarly inside of Google docs to help me pretty things up a bit. Or inside of Grammarly or inside of Hemingway, which is also another great app, free or paid, depending on what you want.

Kimberly:
Right.

Scott:
So speaking of Google docs, for the photographers who hate to type page copy, blog content, or anything like that, even social posts. Right? That you don't actually go to Facebook and type it, you can type it in a Google doc, let's say your draft. For people who hate the typing process, who more prefer things like talking to a human being, could you share some tips for alternative methods for writing content?

Kimberly:
Sure. Yeah. And this is, again, very common. People are like, I'm a terrible typist, or... There's something really weird to people that happens when they put those fingers on the keyboards if they're already scared of writing. I equate it to whenever I see an Excel spreadsheet. The minute I see that spreadsheet, I start to sweat because I don't understand how to make those columns work. I'm terrible at math. That part of my brain does not work.

Scott:
You have to be Jamie Swanson to really swoon over an Excel spreadsheet.

Kimberly:
Yeah. She knows very well of my dislike of spreadsheets. And she will always say, you can put it in a doc if you want. I'm like good. So, yeah. If that's the case with you, if that's really hard for you, then both Word, Google, they all have voice to type. It's free. And I use it quite often when I'm brainstorming. If I'm sitting around and I'm trying to think of blog topics, and I'm just cruising around the internet and I'm looking at things and I'm reading things, I will just... You can open up a Word doc, put on your headphones, if you want. And just start talking. What I do recommend, though, is you don't watch it as it transcribes onto the page because it will mess you up. The more you do it though, the more it gets to know your voice and your cadence, and it'll get it 90% ish right.

Kimberly:
So this isn't for final copy, obviously, but it is a great place if you just need to get it all out. You just need the blab, you can do it in your own documents and then go back and pull out the little parts that you want to say and refine them and type them out. Another great app is Otter AI. I have the app on my phone, and then it also is an online service where you can upload to transcripts. But if I am driving around or in the middle of the night, I have a good idea. I just click on that and I talk right into my phone and it transcribes it.

Kimberly:
And then it also uploads it to the cloud. So I have another copy of it there. I'm a weird one for waking up in the middle of the night and thinking of ideas. Three to 4:00 AM is my prime time brain time for being creative for some reason. If that happens then I just opened up the app and I talk into it for a few minutes and close it up. And sometimes when I go back to Otter to see what I have in there in my little treasure trove, some of it's brilliant. And some of it's like, what was I talking about?

Kimberly:
And it has nothing to do with the way it was transcribed. It's like, you were not fully awake when you decided this was a good idea. You don't have to type it. Even if you're doing social media, cell phones have the little record button where you can go in and you can talk into your phone and then just double check it and make sure everything's grammatically correct and stuff before you hit upload. So if that's your hangup, it's an easy way around that.

Scott:
So I have two things in this topic. One, on the Imagely blog, it's an older article and video, but it's still very valid, because there hasn't changed. I have a video and article all about Google doc and doing this in Google doc and the limitations of it. So you can actually see me doing it and show there's things like punctuation, where you have to say period in order for it to do a period. Because otherwise it's one giant paragraph.

Scott:
So there's some issues with it. But for the most part, I mean, it's Google's AI. So it's very intelligent to figure out what you're saying. The other thing I want to share, similar to Otter is another app that you could try, which to me, in my opinion, there's a slight advantage is Rev dot com who actually does the transcriptions for this podcast. So they have an AI based, very, very affordable AI based transcription service, which we use for the episodes. You can actually opt for a human transcription so that it's more accurate and they have both Android and Apple apps, iOS apps, as well, that you can record on your phone and then have a human translate it instead of AI if you want.

Kimberly:
Yeah. That's awesome. Yeah. I didn't know that about the human with Rev. That's great. It is much more accurate. Rev is much more accurate, in general.

Scott:
Yeah. Yeah. I mean, Otter is great, of course. And also very affordable. I mean they have free and then there's paid. But yeah. So there's options. I'm going to link to all these in the show notes so no worries there for anybody who is trying to keep up with this. It'll be in the show notes. Okay. So everybody's favorite topic, blogging. It's so important for a business. Whether photographers believe it or not, it really is important. Besides from being able to connect with your audience, blogs help you attract new clients, but they're not just limited to your websites. They can be used in other ways. And by your website, I don't mean just your website overall. I mean, it's not just limited to just blog posts. Can you share ways that you think photographers can repurpose the blog content they're writing so that they can help their business in other ways?

Kimberly:
Absolutely. I'm big on repurposing. It's my jam. I think that people don't need to reinvent the wheel. They don't need to work as hard as they are. When you're blogging and you have some information that's really good. Because we're all blogging in shorter paragraphs, phrases, whatever. You can go through in a blog, I just actually did it just before we got on this podcast. I was just editing a blog post for somebody. And I pulled out six social media things for her from the blog. Here you go. Post this with a picture of this. Post this, and then add a little bit on here. Post this and tell them why you love photos hanging on your walls. So if you go through your old blogs, and I'm not talking about the client centered blogs where you blog about somebody's wedding, those you can find nuggets in here and there, I'm talking more about evergreen blogs or blogs you've written about engagement sessions, or the best place for family photos in Sioux Falls or whatever.

Kimberly:
You can go through and pull out one of those bullet points. Let's take the Sioux Falls, for example. You blog about a park that you really love. And right now it's early summer and the peonies are blooming. Go back. Pull out that little chunk. Post it on your social media, and then add a photo from a session you had there. Boom. Done. Out the door. You can do that with every single blog post you do. The blog posts, I just referred to where I pulled out five social media posts, I said to her, go in. I want you to schedule these out every Wednesday right now for the next five weeks you have social media content.

Kimberly:
And she was like, I can do that. And I'm like, yes. You can do that. First of all, the people who are reading your blog are probably a different audience than the people that are on your social media. And also, it all moves so fast. Not everyone sees all your content. So just because you're like, well, I don't want to post that on Facebook because I already said it on my blog. It's fine. Go ahead and do it. The people who have seen it twice won't care, but there's a better chance that they haven't seen it at all.

Scott:
I think that's a fantastic way to do it. And one thing they can do once the blog post is published and they start pushing these out on social is if it's Facebook, for example, don't include the link in the post with the photo, but instead make the first comment being the link to the blog post. So people who care about it are going to check the comments. They are going to see, oh, somebody commented. They're going to look at it and say, oh great. They shared a link to even more about this. Right?

Kimberly:
Yes. Yeah. [crosstalk 00:18:32] And make them work for you. You can even turn your blog content into PDF guides to send your clients.

Scott:
Yes.

Kimberly:
You can link in them in your response emails. Oh. I love that venue. Here's a link to a blog where I shot it for Barbie and Ken's wedding. Besides the SEO benefits, there's just, so...

Scott:
Barbie and Ken.

Kimberly:
That's always my go to.

Scott:
Nice.

Kimberly:
There's so many benefits to blogging and every time I read on a Facebook board or wherever blogging is dead. I think, oh, you are so, so wrong. It's like saying digital will never catch on. It's not true.

Scott:
Right. Yeah. On the topic of creating a PDF, I've got a whole course, which I'll link to in the show notes on lead generation for photographers. And one of the big part of this is a strategic blogging to the point where you're taking specific blog posts that you're creating and turning them into a lead magnet for existing clients or that you want to get back or new leads that want to convert to clients.

Kimberly:
That's awesome.

Scott:
So it's another way that you can repurpose. It's not just social media. It's not just PDFs for clients. It's a variety of things. It's emails. It's replies. It's a whole slew of different things as so many things you can turn them into.

Kimberly:
Yeah. Absolutely.

Scott:
So one thing that I like to drill into the Imagely community is the use of social proof like testimonials. There's a variety of different social proof type things, but I know that you're a fan of testimonials.

Kimberly:
I am.

Scott:
So can you share your opinions and thoughts on these and whatnot?

Kimberly:
I love testimonials because they're free copy. You know? I mean, your clients are literally giving you the words you need to attract other clients like them. And so many people feel weird about them. And I do get that. It is weird the first couple of times you asked for them, but then once you get them, it almost becomes addictive. I ask everyone for testimonials all the time. Because it's social proof and it's true. Right? I didn't make that stuff up. They're not going to give me a testimonial if they didn't really enjoy working with me and you can use them in so many ways. You can use them in your website. It's a great thing to do. If you're not big on writing, you should be putting testimonials on your website. Just in between those pretty pictures of yours, start filling it up with some of the words people have said about you, because they're telling your potential client, this is how they made me feel.

Kimberly:
This is what they did for me. And that person is going to immediately make that brain connection of, well, I want that. That's how I want to feel. And beyond on your website, you can use them for social media. Again, going back to that scheduling it out, photographers, especially, get very hung up on, wall, what if I don't have a photo to go with it, and you don't need a photo. You can make a little template in Canva with your logo on it. There's a ton of them in there make a standard one with your logo in there and then just drop them in there. Even if you... Just a portion of it. And then you have these little beautiful little badges where people are saying nice things about you that you can post.

Scott:
I will say though, that if you do have a photo of the client or a photo that you did for that client who left you a nice review to definitely include it.

Kimberly:
Oh. Absolutely.

Scott:
With that that testimonial.

Kimberly:
Sure.

Scott:
But it's not a hundred percent necessary, but if you have it, you're better to include it.

Kimberly:
Of course.

Scott:
But if you don't, then I do like the Canva approach for various things.

Kimberly:
Yeah. It makes it easy. Also, they can be great for call to action buttons. You know, the buttons on your site that you put in that say learn more or whatever. Hey, just, you don't have to use that learn more. Your template will allow you to change the words in there. So one of the things I love to do with those is like I had someone who recently said that I wrote... I was a rad writer or something. I wrote her rad content. So underneath that quote by her, I have a call to action button that says, get your rad copy now. So when people click on it, you know their content. So you can use them in more ways than just bragging about yourself so your mom knows you're cool.

Scott:
One of my testimonials is from another photographer that I've worked with a lot over the years, somebody I've known for a long, long time. And he left me a nice review years ago just saying, Scott is a bad ass photographer. So I should totally have a button saying that you're bad ass portraits.

Kimberly:
You should. You should. I mean, because that's microcopy and whenever you can use that microcopy in unexpected ways, people love it. It makes you seem more human. It sets you apart from the other people, because it gives them a little chuckle or makes them look twice. So yeah. Use that stuff.

Scott:
Yeah. That's good. That's really good advice to do. Because those call to action button, they get boring. So yeah. I want to do a quick shout out to Seshu from Connecticut Headshots. He left a nice review on the podcast. He said, "A podcast that goes to distance, Scott presents issues and topics in this podcast that are both interesting and important to photographers and they do so with style and substance. It's one of my favorite podcasts and I highly recommend you listen." So thank you, Seshu, for that nice review on Apple podcasts. So, Kim, tell me. You got a course that you had been working on and by the time that this episode airs, it will probably be out and then ready for everybody, I think. Either way, we're going to link to in the show notes so it'll be there for everybody to find, but can you share a bit about your course? Because, obviously, you know what you're doing when you talk about writing. You know what you're doing when you're writing, you know... You're talking about it so nicely, so yeah. Can you tell everybody about this course?

Kimberly:
Yeah. So the course idea came from a couple things. First I do a lot of writing obviously for photographers and as much as I love writing for people there comes a point unless you are making the big bucks where you have to do some of your own content. And so the idea from the course came from the idea that I wanted to help photographers get over the fact that they saw themselves as people who couldn't write. And I'll see it all the time. I'll see these really wonderful things they say on Facebook. And I'll be like, what do you mean you can't write? That was great. But it, again, goes back to what you believe you're good at. So I started the course, it's called Write Better Words, to help photographers understand that writing, it's a framework. Right?

Kimberly:
We're not writing a great American novel. We're not Stephen King. When you're writing words on your website and on your social media, it's to connect you with your clients, it's much more personal. And then also has a hint of conversion in they're trying to get those people from being lookers to buyers. So when you follow a framework, it's much less intimidating also, especially, in the case of the pandemic. It just happened. A lot of people are pivoting their offers. They're adding in new things. They're changing the way they're doing business. And unless you have the funds to pay a professional copywriter several thousand dollars every six months to a year to change your copy, you've got to go in there and do your own. And being able to feel secure that what you're saying is coming from the heart and just connecting with your clients.

Kimberly:
I just think it's so important. I relate it to back in the day when we all had websites that none of us... We couldn't change anything on the backend. Right? There was no Imagely. You had to pay someone a ton of money. Send over the copy. And then if you wanted anything changed, you had to wait. That's not the case anymore. Just like anything else, you have to learn how to do something so that you can make those changes on the fly. So the idea is that I wanted them to feel better about their words.

Scott:
Nice. Yeah. I'm looking forward to, to learning from you as this course gets built out, and released to the public. And I think I might have mentioned this to you, but I am a dyslexic blogger and content creator.

Kimberly:
I had no idea when you told me that. I was like, really?

Scott:
Yeah. So that's one of the reasons why I stumble when I read and also why I have to run my writing through a bunch of different tools and then my wife for her red pen as well. So yeah. So I feel like not only is your course going to help me think more about the words that I actually type out or write down, my handwriting sucks, it'll probably be typing more than anything, but I feel like it'll also helped me with that disability that I have to get past the... On top of the tools that I use on a regular basis anyway.

Kimberly:
Great. Awesome.

Scott:
For me, I look forward for that and I'm sure others will benefit, as well. So I'm glad that you're doing this.

Kimberly:
Thank you. I am too. It's been fun.

Scott:
Yeah. We're going to wrap it up. I just want to say thank you, Kim, for joining me today. I'm going to link to everywhere people can find you in the show notes, but if you can please share the absolute best place for everybody to find more information about you.

Kimberly:
Absolutely. If you want to find out more about me and you went to hire me to write the words for you, you can find me at red curl creative dot com and also on Facebook. If you want to learn more about writing your own words, you can find us on Facebook. We have a private group. It's called Write Better Words for Photographers and Wedding Pros. So just ask to join and I'll let you in. And we post all sorts of free content in there and prompts. Yesterday. I think I posted 10 or 12 different blog post ideas for people. So try to give them stuff to encourage and empower them to come up with their own ideas. So either place you can find me.

Scott:
Awesome. So you can find all the places to find Kim at the show notes and everything else that was referenced in this episode at Imagely dot com slash podcast slash one zero seven. Don't forget to subscribe to the show on Apple podcast, Spotify, Pandora, Google Play, and wherever you listen to podcasts. Until next time.

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clean no 30:35 Scott Wyden Kivowitz
Episode 106 – Brand Photographer or Brand Specialist with John DeMato https://www.imagely.com/podcast/106/ Thu, 18 Jun 2020 13:00:00 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=50993 full 106
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John DeMato is a branded lifestyle portrait photographer who collaborates with expert-based business owners to create an emotional connection with their audiences through persuasive visual storytelling.

John DeMato is a branded lifestyle portrait photographer who collaborates with expert-based business owners to create an emotional connection with their audiences through persuasive visual storytelling.

More than just a photographer, John sets his clients up for success beyond the portrait session by coaching them on how to best leverage their image content for every touchpoint across their online, and off-line, presence.

Preview(opens in a new tab)

A former television producer, John has over 20 years of production experience and has been featured as a portrait photographer expert on several NBC Universal daytime talk and reality shows.

Joke of the day:

A photographer told me his camera didn't have continuous high-speed mode and I almost burst out laughing.

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What we discuss:

  • How we present ourselves as photographers.
  • John's take on personal brand photography.
  • How John helps clients with their branding.
  • John's website advice.

Where to find John:

Transcription:

Transcription was done by Rev.com, using their AI (artificial intellegence) generated transcript. The transcript may contain spelling, grammar, and other errors, and is not a substitute for watching the video or listening to the episode.

Speaker 1:
A photographer told me his camera didn't have continuous high speed mode and I almost burst out laughing. Welcome to episode one Oh six. My name is Scott Wyden Kivowitz and I'm joined by my guest, John Demato. John is a branded lifestyle portrait photographer who collaborates with expert based business owners to create emotional connections with their audiences through persuasive visual storytelling more than just a photographer. John sets his clients up for success beyond the portrait session by coaching them on how to best leverage their image content for every touch point across their online and offline presence. And as a former television producer, John has over 20 years of production experience and has been featured as a portrait photographer expert on several NBC universal daytime talk and reality shows. So as you might know from what I just told you, John knows what he's doing when it comes to branding, headshots, brand photography, and just really publicity and, and, and persona in general. So this is going to be a really nice conversation, John. Welcome to the WordPress photography podcast. Wow.

Speaker 2:
Thank you Scott, for having me. Although I'm having second thoughts after listening to that dead joke. You just dropped.

Speaker 1:
Oh boy. Yeah. Yeah. We have like what I call informal seasons cause I don't really put a S like a cap on seasons. I take a break every August and then start the podcast again after that. So basically since September I've been trying to do a really cheesy joke for every episode it's been working out. But my my Arsenal's running out, so I'm sure there's a website somewhere that you can grab a whole bunch of those and apply for, for us photographers. Yeah. So today we're going to be talking about brand photography and really the differences between being a brand photographer and really a brand specialist. Cause I think you are more than just a brand photographer. You are a brand specialist.

Speaker 2:
Well, first, the first thing, Scott, is a, for me when it comes to branding, photography, I, there's a certain way in which I see our community using it that I feel is being misused. Quite frankly, I think that a lot of photographers refer to themselves as quote unquote branding. I do not refer to myself as a branding photographer. By the way, the only place that you'll ever see me say branding photography is in my SEO, my URLs and metadata because that is what my audience knows me as, but I've referred to myself as a Brenda lifestyle portrait photographer, and it's because when you're talking about serving a particular audience and you're talking about branding, it's not just a headshot. It's not just a photo of someone working on a laptop. It encompasses a wide array of images that illustrate who that person is, who they serve and why they do what they do.

Speaker 2:
Essentially, it's not just about the aesthetics, it's not just about the one thing. It's it's understanding that person, their personality, why they do what they do and how they do it, and incorporating all of those key elements into the photography because the photography is not about the photographer. Contrary to what a lot of us believe, contrary to what I believed up until about three years ago when I niched my business to serve speakers and authors and expert based business owners, it's about them. It's about finding the beauty of what they, at least for my particular the way in which I shoot lifestyle photography as well as some portrait work as well, looking into the camera. But it's, it's about finding how to use our aesthetic abilities and our gift behind the camera and finding the beauty in those moments and centering it on them and not just making it about the aesthetics. It's the value proposition of these images really creating an emotional connection with their audiences. Cause that's what we're doing. Right.

Speaker 1:
True. Yeah. yeah. And you know as photographers we, we need to present ourselves how we want our clients to see us as well. We, we need to be seen in a way that will appeal to the clients that we want specifically, right? Not, not just to anybody. So for as, as a good example a friend of mine, Mike Alibaba, he originally, when he, for years, he was a wedding photographer. He's now switched John Rose to now doing boudoir photography mainly. But he always called himself the tattooed bride photographer because he wanted clients who were covered in tattoos and wanted these, these more exotic weddings. Like he, I don't know if you've ever been to Eastern state penitentiary in Philadelphia, but he would always have clients whose weddings were at this prison, this abandoned prison, and it's now a museum. Yeah. I love that place. So, so a good example is if we want tattooed client that we need to show off our tattoos, right? I mean, if you want, if you want that client, you need to portray yourself and your work in that way. So I'm wondering if you could talk

Speaker 2:
A bit about how we present ourselves as photographers. Absolutely. In fact, that is one of the biggest things that I harp on when it comes to educating photographers on how to present themselves memorably and referrability through their online presence. It's not just about the images, it's not in fact that's, that's one piece. But what it really is about, it's about the stories that you share. It's not about sharing your images and show how great your work is. In fact that you know, your client doesn't care if you had a wonderful session or a great, you know, a bridal shoot or a save the date and we rocked the session and you know, some crap like that. No one cares about that. What they care about is what were the challenges that these people had in front of your camera that you solved for them.

Speaker 2:
It always comes down to problem solving. It always comes down to making it about what you do for the client and you do. And in terms of sharing who you are as a person, it's the way in which you share that story. Your voice comes through those words. Your voice comes through in that video where your personality comes out and the way that you direct people and basically potential clients will see this stuff and they see the work and the work is great that gets them in the front door. But what keeps them in the house is who you are as a person and whether or not when they qualify you, that will let them know that you're a good fit to work with them. So it's about, it's a mixture when it comes to branding yourself through your online presence. It's sharing your expertise.

Speaker 2:
It's sharing your life as a business owner, as a photographer, as someone who is out there in the world, making it for him or herself, and it's sharing your life as a human being on the planet. See those other two piece, the expertise piece. A lot of people may or may not get, and I'm not talking about, I shot at F two at one 61 60th of a shutter, not the, not the numbers, it's about the problem solving stuff that illustrates your expertise. How did you troubleshoot? You know, why do you do what you do? But then the stuff about being a business owner and and sharing your life, that stuff is about creating relationships because ultimately that is how photographers build a referrable brand and a memorable brand. It's by building relationships. It's by connecting with people beyond the photographs. It's building trust and it's being relatable. That's why you want to share a full scope of your life with your audience because otherwise you're playing the SEO game. You're commoditizing your business and it's a race to the bottom. But when you do the opposite and you present yourself in that way and you go after relationships, that's a race to the top that makes you a premium photographer. It presents you as an authority in your particular space of photography, whatever that discipline is by niching yourself and presenting yourself as that thing and that's how you make more money.

Speaker 1:
Would you say that besides from sharing your stories and photographs of you as the photographer, maybe behind the scenes or things like that, would you say having somebody film you on EnVideo is also really important for your, for your, your, your photography brand to show who like you, you like actually show you like moving in your life. Okay. So it might be worth for, for photographers to start considering having assistance there to, to their sole purpose is not to help you with the lighting and stuff, but their sole purposes document you in video.

Speaker 2:
Yeah. It's not an assistant. I wouldn't even refer to him as an assistant. I would refer to that person as someone who is con. Maybe like a PA, like a production assistant or a social media person, someone basically if I had the obviously you know, dealing with what's going on right now is a little bit of a push with finances and everything and shoots. But when, when things are going, when when I'm rolling, whenever I have an opportunity to hire somebody to do some behind the scenes video and kind of capture those moments, it's important because what, what that's doing is yeah. Yeah, it looks cool. I had that hap, I had that done once. A client actually brought her videographer to our session in Manhattan and he shot some stuff and I asked him afterwards cause he was not going to, he was just using that stuff for a documentary on her, cause she's a keynote speaker.

Speaker 2:
I asked him to just send me some selects because obviously, you know, I'm producer and video editor and all of that. So I'm like, just send it to me, I'll cut something. I put that thing off and I got a ton of response. And it wasn't just because, Oh look at Johnny looks like the bad-ass. I mean it looked great, but what it really did was I harped on the fact that it showed the connection and the relationship during the session of me sharing the photos with her as we're shooting me directing. And it was all voice. It was all a music and montage, but it was the facial expressions and you could see the slow roll of me directing and that stuff really helps kind of demystify your process and that's a part of building your brand, demystifying your process so people really can have that, those touch points to really kind of understand how you create your magic.

Speaker 1:
Yeah. And you know, it's, it's, there's something about video that really makes somebody connect with you in your business. That about it. So there is a huge difference between headshot photography, commercial photography and, and branded lifestyle photography. So can you share with the listeners some, some insights into the lengths you go to dig deep into helping your clients with their branding? And even if it's just like an example client that you don't even have to say names, but like an example of, of a way that you dug deep to figure out how you could help that person more than just here's some photos.

Speaker 2:
Yeah. that's every single client I have. I don't just show up in at a location and hope for the best. We don't do that. What I do is I have a list of about 30 questions that I ask before every single session to unearth certain things about not just who the person is. You know, just kinda, basically I'm gauging their personality to see how I need to adapt my direct directing style to really resonate with them to make sure that I get them on board. That is always happening in the background. But aside from that, I'm trying to find out what does work look like to them? Is it all virtual? Is it in person? Do they work in a coworking space? Like I'm getting ideas on locations of getting ideas on that process. Is that a tablet? Do they work off the phone?

Speaker 2:
Do they use zoom? Are they, are they in person most of the time? Then I'm finding out other things like what books inspire their thought leadership, like what books inspire their productivity, what does productivity look like to them? How, you know, what does a typical day look like? Because I'm shooting lifestyle portrait. So I'm trying to get all of those pieces and figure out if I'm going to their house to shoot it in real life or if we're going to stage it in a coworking space or in a Airbnb or if we're going to shoot on the street in the park, whatever. So I'm getting all of this insight into who they are. And then once that is done, as a matter of fact, there was one time where this led to a really interesting little addition, which is I had a client who is originally from Nigeria.

Speaker 2:
She's a keynote speaker and a lawyer and she speaks on the immigrant women experience here in the United States. And I was talking to her about her wardrobe cause that's another, I mean, I mean, yeah, I don't really harp on the traditional makeup and wardrobe. It's like, yes, we need makeup. Yes we need wardrobe and blah, blah, blah blah. And I kind of have questions that, but this particular case, the wardrobe question really, really helped because she was just like, yeah, corporate attire and I wear this. And I'm like, what do you wear when you're public facing when you speak, not just when you work as a lawyer for a banking institution as well, where I wear basically the same thing. I'm like, Oh, okay, well I was on your social media feed before we got on the phone and I noticed that you weren't a lot of traditional African outfits.

Speaker 2:
And I saw a bunch of them and she said, yeah, well you know I wear them a formal occasions but what does that have to do with, you know, what we're doing? I'm like, you speak on the immigrant woman experience, you're from Africa, you're in the United States. I think it's kind of would be cool if you would wear some of those assets. Turns out she brought three of them. We shot a bunch of them and she uses them everywhere, including all of the talks that she does. She uses them as promotional images for the talks that she does for, especially on the immigrant stuff. So I'm like, do you see how that works?

Speaker 1:
You know? And I would imagine that just aside from it being more her personality and who she is and her background and everything, but I'd also imagine just from the way you explained it, lawyer outfit versus this, that these outfits are probably way more colorful too. They're probably a whole nother vibe.

Speaker 2:
Oh yeah, no, yeah, I mean aesthetic. And then I had her dancing in them. I shot photos of her against the wall dancing in the house. It was great. But yeah, exactly. Because the thing is is that when it comes to personal branding photos, all of that stuff matters. The aesthetics matter, the emotion matters. The personality matters. The how you serve your people, all of it matters. It's not just, you know, one piece. Right.

Speaker 1:
Okay. So I want to dig in a little bit into some more website specific things now. So are there any specific website tips, advice that you would give to headshot photographers or other branded lifestyle photographers that are trying to pill buildup that part of their business or pivot to that type of business or something? Any funnel tips, organization tips, design tips, anything that you have that you, that you have found has worked well for your website or, or colleagues of yours that, that you think could work well for others?

Speaker 2:
Sure. Identify, first of all identify who your core audiences. Now let's more photographers will shoot whatever the hell we can shoot just either for fun for the hell of it or maybe make some money on the side, but, and that's all well and good. But if you're looking to get into a place where you build a, you know, referrable business that like, as I mentioned earlier, you know that that builds in premium rates, presents you as an authority. You need to niche, identify a core audience that you serve and figure out what their problems are that is above all else because, and then you write about that stuff. Go ahead. I'm sorry. Yeah, no, and when you say that, you don't just mean, okay, I'm, I now photograph regular lifestyle portraits. You mean? You mean not only do I do it, but speakers are my niche.

Speaker 2:
Yes. So you're talking like really specific. Yeah. There's a fear amongst us amongst our shooters where it's like, Oh my God, if I, if I don't talk to everybody, I'm going to shoot nobody. The reality is this is the less people that you talk to, the more work you're going to get. That is something that is the most important thing about your website that photographers need to understand because it's the one that most of us don't do and it's what pigeonholes us with every body else. And as I said, it becomes a commoditized product and it's a race to the bottom. That fear needs to be broken and clearly illustrated in your website that you serve one audience with one particular style and you solve a specific set of problems to that audience with that niche period, you know, in, in the for anybody listening who does family portraits, for example, you might be wondering, okay, well how do I niche down when it comes to families?

Speaker 2:
Well, one thing would be, for example you know, instead of being the photographer who takes the $150 sessions and calls a day and then knocks out 10 of those in a day in order to make money, you could be the photographer, the family photographer that has a higher session fee and on your website, your marketing, Prince, Prince, Prince, wall art, wall, wall art, so that you're showing people, look, it's not just Prince, it's albums, it's Walmart, it's, it's higher end items, not just a quick session with digitals. Right. so it's funny you mentioned that actually because a colleague, a friend and a client of mine, Jeff Shaw, who is a speaker and speaks on personal branding, is a photographer. And he built exactly what you just said into a six and seven figure business for a very long time focusing on wealthy families and his, and basically the way he did that was changed the lingo. That's the name of his book, the lingo in his, all of his messaging. That's his, that's his jam. That's what he speaks on. He changed his messaging on his website, in his social, the way he presented himself physically to these people as a way to attract them in. And that's who he shot, that's who he served. It's exactly what you could do with your online presence starting with your website.

Speaker 1:
Awesome. okay, so a bit of a rapid fire question. This one, you might take you a little bit to figure to it, to come up with an answer and that's okay cause we can edit out that space. If you had the time, which I know right now, a lot of us have time, but if you had the time and the money to make a drastic change to your website that is guaranteed to boost business 10 X, what would it be?

Speaker 2:
Wow. I wonder, I wonder if such a magic pill exists. I don't know. I mean honestly I kinda dig where I am with my website, but if I had like a way to make it better.

Speaker 1:
Is there, is there something that you've been dying to do that you just haven't had the chance to do to your website?

Speaker 2:
Well, well, you know what, I would, you know what? Yeah, actually I do what I would probably do because I don't really play the SEO game very much to be quite honest with you because my work is basically through referral and, and, and that's kinda how and the communities in which I'm a part of. However, what I would probably do for the website is hire someone to duplicate my homepage and duplicate some of my other pages for some of the other services and play with the keywords. Cause I would never want to do that. That would absolutely drive me not. So I would change everything and isolate and maybe do different keywords on the thing, on each page and see, see if that actually would make any difference whatsoever in what I do. My, my, my initial inclination is it wouldn't simply based on my model. However, if I had money and time, that's what I would do,

Speaker 1:
You know, and, and SEO like putting a, have a dedicated SEO person is expensive. So that's the good answer. It's right in line with it. You know, it, I have, I have a feeling that, that, you know a successful business that is not focused on SEO, you actually can, by focusing on SEO, you can actually improve your business even more because you're just going to show up in more search terms that you're not showing up.

Speaker 2:
I know. I, yeah. Well I will say this in, in, in fairness to SEO, I still play the game to a certain extent because through my blogs and through my metadata, through the URL codes, like I said before at the beginning, I write personal brand photo, like everywhere, all tags, all of that. So yeah, it has a purpose.

Speaker 1:
Yeah. and, and the other thing is like a lot of people focus on Google and only Google when in reality and, and you're, you're partially, you're partially doing this is in reality. The second most popular search engine is YouTube. So you know what we talked about earlier, getting to video, you can optimize the heck out of YouTube videos and now you'll show up for, for a Google's terms and you'll show up in video on YouTube and on Google

Speaker 2:
As well. Yeah, yeah. I do a blog. So I, I read a blog, speaking of YouTube, I write a blog and every it's 13 blogs a month, by the way. I do Monday, Wednesday and Friday. And up until this whole thing happened, I was scheduled two and a half months out. But I paused it because a lot of this stuff's written out of context. However I will go back to them, but every Friday I do a video blog and it's through YouTube. I started doing that for that very reason to show up cause it is the second largest search engine in the world. And also it allows people to get a sense of your personality. That's the other cool thing about it because what a lot of people, what a lot of photographers do is, Oh, and behind the camera I only want to be behind the camera. That's a load of BS. You could be behind the camera all day, but if you want a successful business, people need to know who the hell you are. And they need to know whether or not your, you know, the type of person they want to work with. And by doing that YouTube stuff, it immediately lets them know whether or not your style and your personnel is going to resonate.

Speaker 1:
Yup. I can't agree more with that. So is there, is there anything before we wrap this up, anything that you'd like to share? Any final advice or just something you want to you know, promote or anything you got going on that you want to talk about? I mean, I think one of the biggest things

Speaker 2:
When it comes to being a photographer is that I think oftentimes we get lost in the fact that it's a job. But we need to be grateful for the fact that we have figured out a way to make money off of something that we would do for free. And that, and honestly and honestly, it's, it's really on us to figure out what is the type of work that we want to do in photography that will, we will never feel resentful of and build our business based on that love and that passion and not just pick up the camera because we can make a check off of it. Don't lose sight of that, that passion that you have for what you do for your art. Build on that. Don't just have that on the side. Let it be the thing because that is what will get you through all the dips, the ups, the downs, the twisty turns that we inevitably go through as artists making a living. And I think really that's something that especially now with all of the time that we have on our hands to think about stuff, I think we really need to kind of hone in and kind of think about, you know, where we are with what we're doing. And

Speaker 2:
Maybe make some adjustments or, or double down on what we're already doing.

Speaker 1:
Well said. That was very well said. So I want to say thank you, John, for joining me today on this episode. I'm going to share wherever all the places, everybody can find you on the show notes. But if you can tell the listeners the absolute best place to find more information about you, the best place

Speaker 2:
To find me would be John demato.com. You can start there and all my socials there. You can sign up for my newsletter there to read about all the fun meanderings that pop out of my head and shoot me a little message and say hi and introduce yourself.

Speaker 1:
Awesome. you can find the show notes and where to find John at imagely.com/podcast/one zero six and don't forget to subscribe to the show on Apple podcast, Spotify, Pandora, Google, play in the, wherever you listen to podcasts. Until next time.

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clean no 28:31 Scott Wyden Kivowitz
Episode 105 – Are You On The Right Path? https://www.imagely.com/podcast/105/ Thu, 04 Jun 2020 13:00:00 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=50872 105
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Page builders are a funny thing. At first glance, you most likely think that they will make your life easier as a website owner. The fact that you can design your site however you want with a beautiful drag and drop interface.

But in reality, many of these things are causing some harm to your site. Nothing that is irreproachable of course. But some, more than others, can not only confuse you in your WordPress experience but can also cause an immense amount of work down the road.

In this episode, we touch on the topic of page builder plugins for WordPress.

Joke of the day:

Why shouldn't you steal from someone holding a camera? Because they have a photographic memory. 

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Shoutout

Very informative podcast! I LOVE this podcast. It’s very informative and provides actionable insights. Highly recommend!

Indianapolis Portrait Photographer

Transcription:

Transcription was done by Rev.com, using their AI (artificial intellegence) generated transcript. The transcript may contain spelling, grammar, and other errors, and is not a substitute for watching the video or listening to the episode.

Why shouldn't you steal from someone holding a camera because they have a photographic memory. He, this is Scott Wyden Kivowitz and you are listening to episode one Oh five of the WordPress photography podcast. Today I am going to share my opinion on something. Now, this is not necessarily the opinion of Imagely as a whole, but this is my personal opinion and one that I am a strong believer in and think that everybody listening should consider paying attention to. Now here's the thing. There are so many page builders out there and there are some popular ones, some not so popular ones. The ones that you probably are already familiar with as a photographer are Elementor Devi, Beaver builder, probably the page builder inside of the pro photo theme, and maybe even the one in flow themes. And here's the thing, I don't recommend any of them. I don't. I used to use Elementor before were press 5.0 came out before WordPress had its own page builder built in to the core of WordPress itself.

The new block editor is a page builder. Now, it may not look like every other page builder that you're used to in either a theme or plugin, but it is a page builder and the plugins that add extra functionality to the block editor, adding additional blocks, enhance this page builder type feel that we're press has in core. And the best part is that it does not deviate from WordPress, meaning that if you add cadence or code blocks, it is not actually making your WordPress experience feel like something else. It is making it feel like WordPress, but giving you even more features and more control than what WordPress itself on its own has to offer. And that is the main reason why I prefer using either core blocks or like the cadence plugin for example. But there's other reasons. If you are using the Divi theme, for example, not just the Divi page builder plugin but the Divi theme one, like I just said, it does not look like WordPress at all, but too if you're using the theme, you are now officially locked in to using the Divi theme forever or you're going to have to deal with a giant mess of cleanup.

If you ever change themes, sure you could install the Divi page builder plugin and switch to another theme and you can get away with that, but if you go to leave the Divi page builder plugin, again you are left with a mess of that of cleanup to do afterwards.

Elementary does a little bit better job as does BeaverBuilder does a little bit better job of converting your page builder content to default WordPress content if you leave their plugins, but DV is a different thing because Devi uses something called short codes for every aspect of its page builder. Then there's also themes like pro photo and flow themes. While they are absolutely beautiful and they function well. They are again built into the themes. Flow themes does have an additional plugin for their page builder. I think it's called flow box and while again, while it is beautiful, it is such a deviation from core WordPress that is actually misleading you as to what we're press is and how WordPress works and how easy WordPress can actually be if you stay using products that keep you in the WordPress ecosystem, but once you use something like a DV, a Beaver builder and Elementor, a pro photo theme, a flowed theme, you are so far away from what WordPress is and now you are probably led to believe this is what WordPress is when really it is not, or if you're using the theme and you're used to one settings module and then you go to use a different theme or a different plugin, you're going to be so confused because you're not used to it.

You're going to be thinking everything is broken, that everything does not work. Right. That is ugly. That is this, that is that, that whatever your comments will be, you will have some sort of comments. So I'm a firm believer in sticking with themes and plugins that utilize WordPress. How were presses intended, not stuff that deviates so far from it that it confuses you. Back in episode 33, I recorded an episode called WordPress and misconceptions and confusions and this kind of goes back to that. It kind of goes back to that episode. So if you want to listen to more about this topic in particular, listen to episode 33. I'll link to it in the show notes for this episode, but I am a firm believer they used to stick to where press Corp type content themes, plugins.

I highly recommend avoiding page builder plugins or page builder themes that will lead you to believe WordPress is something. It is not. That is that the user interface is something that it is not or to confuse you more than you already. You might confused, you stick to products that keep with the WordPress ecosystem is how it as to how it's designed, you're less likely to begin fused in the future and your learning process will flow from one product to another. That's my small little rant for this episode one Oh five and I, I'm happy to answer any questions. I'm happy to take an argument. If you feel the complete opposite way, please comment at the show notes and let me know because this is just my opinion and you probably have a completely different opinion and that's perfectly fine. The show notes for this episode can be found at imagely.com/podcast/one zero five I look forward. I look forward to hearing your thoughts on it. Thanks for listening.

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clean no 7:41 Scott Wyden Kivowitz
Episode 104 – Your Sent Emails https://www.imagely.com/podcast/104/ Thu, 21 May 2020 13:00:00 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=50859 full 104
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A very popular issue that comes up in many WordPress forums, groups and even the Imagely support inbox are about how emails are sent. Depending on your host and how the server is set up, emails could come from an address you do not want to be used. You can adjust this with one easy free plugin. In this episode, we discuss the plugin.

Joke of the day:

Where does a cow hang his photos?

In a mooooseum. 

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Shoutout

Very good podcast for photographers. I enjoyed listening to the topics covered so far. Very good tips given.

Ivan's Photography

Transcription:

Transcription was done by Rev.com, using their AI (artificial intellegence) generated transcript. The transcript may contain spelling, grammar, and other errors, and is not a substitute for watching the video or listening to the episode.

Where does a cow hang his photos in a meme? welcome to episode 104 my name is Scott Wyden Kivowitz, the chief community officer here at Imagely, and you're listening to the WordPress photography podcast. Today we are going to be talking about a topic that comes up quite often in the Imagely support inbox, and it's not something that is specific to Imagely, but it's actually WordPress in general. Now, WordPress utilizes a PHP function and it that is a function that sends email through your server and this, this is called WP mail in the WordPress side, PHP mail, and the PHP side. That programming language PHP, which were presses built on. Now what happens is if you get a new order and your customer gets the email you get, the email comes, sometimes comes from wordpress@yourdomain.com sometimes it's website that your host.com sometimes it's a random email, a thing that doesn't make sense, and sometimes if you're lucky, you're in your host and servers set up perfectly, it will actually come in from whatever your admin email addresses.

But that's not always the case. So here's how to get control of this. You're going to install a plugin called WP mail, S. M T. P. this is a freemium plugin, meaning there's a free version and a paid version for most people. The free version does exactly what you need. Now SMTP stands for a simple mail transfer protocol. It is something that has existed since 1982 and this basically controls sending emails so when you install WP mail SMTP, there is going to be a wizard to walk you through setting it up, but basically you want to make sure that you have set up your from name and you're going to force that from name. You're going to have a from email address and you're going to force that from email address. Then you are actually going to choose where you want your email to be sent from. What platform.

Now built into the free version are a bunch of things like default. If you want to just try to override the default settings of your server, but I don't recommend that there is Gmail outlook and then other SMTP all built in. Meaning you can actually with a few clicks connect your Gmail account and have that go and be able to send email through your Gmail account. What does that actually, what I do personally from my photography website, and if you have a G suite like I do, it works just the same. If you want to go with other SMTP, you just have to know your SMTP information, which again is from your email provider. Now hopefully your email provider is actually separate from your host because that way you're not relying on the same servers or your website in order to send emails. Hopefully it is completely separate.

That is work. So what I do, so for example, my domains with hover, my hosting is actually with WP engine and my email is actually through G suite or Gmail. So there are three separate things, which is good. That's a safe way to do things. That means not everything will go, can possibly go down at the same time and reduces some risk. Now if you do not use any of these and you want something different like Amazon SES or SendGrid or Mailgun or send in blue or anything like that, there is a paid version of of WP mail SMTP that you can upgrade to and have more control over that. It gives you some, it gives you some other things as well. For example they have a white glove setup thing. If you pay, there's a some email logging if you pay, although there are free email logging plugins that you can install if you want to see the emails your site is sending.

But what's cool is once you set this up, there's also an email test feature that you can actually email yourself. A test ended up show that it's coming from what you set up. So that is how you take control over what is or how rather your, your emails are being sent. Now I have to give a shout out to Felicia. Man, she gave a nice five star review on the podcast. She said, very good podcast for photographers. I enjoy listening to the topics covered so far. Very good tips given, and this is snapshot by ivan.com so I want to say thank you to Felicia and Ivan who are the principal photographers and owners of Ivan's photography. If you want to learn more about taking control over how your emails are being sent, just go to the show notes, imagely.com/podcast/104 I will link to the how to article that we have about this in on the Imagely blog and I will also link to the free plugin that you can install yourself anytime. If you have any questions, comment, and we look forward to seeing you in the next episode.

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clean no 6:01 Scott Wyden Kivowitz
Episode 103 – SEO Ear Candy with Corey Potter & Dylan Howell https://www.imagely.com/podcast/103/ Thu, 07 May 2020 13:00:28 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=50793 full 103
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Corey Potter & Dylan Howell

In this episode, we talk to Corey and Dylan from Fuel Your Photos about their new podcast, SEO for Photographers. Not only will you learn about their new show, but you'll also get some immediate action items to take away with you right now.

These are two guys study and implement search engine optimization for the photography industry. Corey has been running a very large SEO Facebook group for many years, and he brought Dylan on as a partner as he has been growing the Fuel Your Photos brand.

Joke of the day:

The only person happy with a 100% crop is a farmer.

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What we discuss:

  • The SEO for Photographers Podcast.
  • The one SEO action item you should take at this moment.
  • What you can expect from Fuel Your Photos in the future.

Where to find Corey and Dylan:

Transcription:

Transcription was done by Rev.com, using their AI (artificial intellegence) generated transcript. The transcript may contain spelling, grammar, and other errors, and is not a substitute for watching the video or listening to the episode.

Scott:
The only person happy with a 100% crop is a farmer. Welcome to episode one zero three my name is Scott Wyden Kivowitz and I'm joined by my guest, Corey Potter and Dylan Howell. Now you might recognize Cory's voice from episode 32 when we talked about SEO in 2017. Wow. But now for now we're in, we're in the year 2020 and a lot has changed. In fact, a lot has changed because in 2017, Corey and I could just hang out at WPPI, but if she doesn't 20 and we're all kind of bunkered down in our homes because of coven 19. So we can do things like this, a podcast remotely. In fact, the three of us are in very different parts of the United States. So that's always fun, right? So why don't you each introduce yourself Corey just share a little about yourself and then we'll go onto Dylan. Sure. It's funny, I was always like, whenever you say introduce yourself, I'm like, what do I want to talk about here? But I mean, like in,

Corey:
In context for this podcast, you know, I was a, in high school I started with some web development and website building and right, right around college I started deciding that I was going to offer SEO services to local businesses and build websites and all at the same time I stumbled across photography and it ended up taking off pretty fast to the point where I was like, Oh, well actually I'm just going to do photography full time. So my wife and I were wedding photographers for almost 10 years. And we grew the business pretty fast in the beginning, mostly because of WordPress, in my opinion. It's, I was, I was on WordPress before most photographers were using WordPress and it was a huge advantage for me back in the day. So that's my little that's how I got into photography and how I got into WordPress SEO all at the same time.

Scott:
Great. And Dylan?

Dylan:
Yeah, so I'm a photographer as well based in Portland, Oregon. And I got into SEO also, like around my college years. I had a business building bicycle wheels that I needed to do marketing for. That was a fun business, but I also stumbled into SEO or sorry, into photography actually to do the product photography for that business. And then had friends getting married, shut their weddings and the wedding photography business absolutely took off as well. So I've been doing that. I've, I've been slowly not phasing it out, but shooting less weddings over the last few years and concentrating more on SEO and marketing. But yeah, still shoot a few weddings, maybe about 10 a year and a really concerning on SEO education.

Scott:
Great. Yeah. You know, doing some, especially when it's not your, your, your main thing anymore doing photography even 10 times a year, like, which a wedding is not a little thing. Right. It's a, that's a, that's a big thing. So doing it 10 times a year is more than enough for somebody who's doing that as a secondary job to keep it fresh in your mind and, and keep the gears turning and whatnot. So for sure. Yeah. I do have a question though about the whole bicycle tire thing. Well, bicycle wheel. So you're talking, you're talking like you actually bent the metal, put in the spokes, like talk, tell, tell, share a little bit about that. Cause I'm so curious

Dylan:
For sure. So I was, I was mostly concentrating on high-end racing wheels and so I would be getting typically carbon fiber rims either from U S sources or from China. And then I'd be sourcing the hubs and spokes and all of the small parts. And then I'd be putting them, I'd be pretty much assembling. So I'd, I'd spec out the correct components for the writer and assemble them in the, ship them off.

Scott:
That's really cool. That's really cool. Yeah. I with this whole lockdown thing, I've been doing a lot more cardio work than cause I have a little bit more time now. I'll be doing some more cardio work than in the past. So mixing up between biking and and running. And my bike is a heavier Trek bike, even though it's aluminum, it's still heavy. And I have a car baby seat on the back. I was going to say car seat, a baby seat in the back. So I'm not so not so fun. It's so heavy. You're getting a workout, but yeah, and getting a workout. Okay. So let's dive into this. You guys partnered together first. Furio fuel your photos was just Cory's thing. And then when I met Corey at WPPI, probably 2017, 16, actually 16, 2016. I think you were just starting fuel your photos at that point or, right.

Scott:
So you guys partnered, I was going to say recently, but it's been a while at this point too. It's like the end of 2018, I think. Great. Yeah, so it's been growing. You've, you've put out an SEO course. You've got this striving Facebook group all all of you know, your community of a few of your photos, followers and readers and listeners and whatnot. And now you have a podcast. Now the time we're recording this, I think you have seven or eight episodes, if I'm not mistaken. And by the time this airs you'll have probably double that I'd imagine, because this is entering a month from basically a month from now. So so tell the listeners about your podcast because I feel like yes, there's going to be some overlap with the WordPress photography, but at the same time you have a, because the, the title of it, you've got a heavy focus on specific thing, which is also a very specific but also broad cause that's the, Oh isn't just a fine needle thing anymore. It's so broad. So why don't you share a little bit about that?

Corey:
It's funny because we had, we've talked about starting a podcast since when we first started partnering and it was like we should definitely do a podcast. And we tried it a couple of times and it was just super awkward at first. And then as our relationship grew, we talked a lot more, all that stuff, you know, after a year or so of, I was working together on a daily basis, we're like, Oh, this will be much easier now. Let's try it again. So we decided to start recording and basically we were like, there's a lot of stuff we could do, but we could just talk about SEO for hours. So let's just pick some thing to talk about and start talking and see where it goes. And then we did and people gave us pretty good feedback and so we decided to keep recording episodes. Yeah. And yeah, I think we're up to two episodes a week right now because we have the time.

Scott:
It's amazing how like, you know such a world changing thing can, it has a lot of negatives of course, but at the same time it allows a lot of us to do things that we've been trying to do for awhile and haven't had a chance to do or, or in some ways be more productive in and knock out a whole bunch more content than we might normally have been able to do. So can you share a, a few topics that you've already talked about on, on the podcast?

Corey:
Yeah. Our, our most recent ah, topic was pretty fun. It's been well received, but we, we looked at all of the website platforms that photographers typically use and we just tore them apart. We only talked about the cottons. And so that was kind of fun to show people that each platform has issues and there you have to find workarounds for those. Some platforms just have more issues and probably aren't worth dealing with. But yeah, we had a whole episode where we like looked at our own websites and our link profiles and just went through 30 different links that we had obtained over the years and talked about how we got them. We've had Q and a episodes, or at least one, I think we recorded two. We've only published one. So we're just trying to, I mean there's a lot of different topics we're probably going to cover in the future. We're thinking about how many guests and you know, just interviewing people who have had success with different SEO methods and yeah, it, it's been fun and random so far.

Scott:
Great. Yeah. So yeah, I, I'm, I'm, I'm just, because of my technical nature of things, of course I'm very excited for, for where you're going to take the show and what, you know, all the different topics that you could be bringing up. And I like the fact that you're mixing it up between Q and a and then some you know, some, some sort of data driven things and it's going to be good. I'm looking forward for it. So now if the listeners have everybody listening right now had to take only one SCO action, like at this moment, what would be each of your recommendations? If they can only do one thing right now, what would it be, Corey?

Corey:
Oh, let's see. Hmm. It's, it's tricky to pick one thing. I would say the easiest thing you could do right now would probably be to check your homepage title, make sure that your title is solid, it's matching keywords that people are actually searching for. I mean, I feel like that's where I would start. But then again, maybe 50 or 70% of people have already done that. So, I mean, if you haven't done that, that's one thing I would recommend fixing both.

Dylan:
Yeah. And I would take that like the next step further that you're only targeting that keyword with that homepage or one page. That's like, those are the two issues that I think we see on most photography sites.

Scott:
Oh yeah. People, people adding multiple keywords that are there. Oh yeah.

Corey:
Multiple pages that target the same keywords. So like if you, if you target Columbia wedding photographers with your homepage, then you don't want that appearing on every other page of your site. So I guess, you know, if you've already fixed your homepage, then maybe take that a step further. I think what Dylan's saying here is basically look at your template settings, like in WordPress, your site title, and see is it being appended to every single page on your site? And if so, is it using the same keyword as you use on your homepage? If so, cut that out. Yeah.

Scott:
Great. And you know, if for people using Yoast SEO, they can actually not necessarily automate this, but they can actually, if they're using the focus keyword or focus query after I already have it, they even call it now the focus word in, in on their pages and posts. The Yoast will actually tell you if you are using it the same one in multiple places. Or so that's kind of a nice, nice little thing that if you're utilizing it it'll actually in theory prevent you from, from doing it. So so what what can we expect, I know you talked, you touched a little bit about you know, where, you know, a little bit where you could take it, but what should we expect from the show in the future? Are you going to try to stay consistent or are you going to just go with the flow and put out episodes when you can? You know, what should we expect what your listeners expect?

Dylan:
Yeah, I think we're going to be aiming for at least one episode a week. I think during this time at home we might be doing up to two a week. We're also putting out constant YouTube content and we're trying to also publish blogs. So it's a lot of content coming from fuel your

Corey:
Photos right now. Yeah, yeah. From the podcast I would say. It kind of depends on how people are responding. So we'd love to get feedback, you know, if people love specific kinds of episodes, we'll probably do more of those. Like I said, we're going to experiment with bringing on some guests who are not necessarily SEO experts, but people who have had success with a specific method or you know, maybe they've had success going through our course or something like that. We may interview those people to say what exactly worked for you and how, how could other people potentially apply that? That's kind of something I'm excited about for the future of the podcast. And then, I mean, just Dylan and I talking, one of the things we've decided is a podcast is a great way for us to basically do our initial content brainstorming so we can just talk it out on a podcast and it's more casual laid back. And then we get it all out there and then we can listen back to it, take notes or look at the show notes and our transcript and then turn that into a blog post or a YouTube video or something like that. So yeah, it's just going to be our way of talking through ideas, what's working, what's not working.

Scott:
You know, that kind of thing. Great. And so you touched on, you touched on something that, phew, feel your photos, you've got the podcast, you've got the deep channel, you've got the blog, you've got the Facebook group, each of which you're knocking out content pretty consistently across the mall. The YouTube channel, especially now, I mean, I know you did that, that challenge for yourself, you know, to, can you actually do it and you're doing it. You've done your R U B Oh, you passed a month already of daily videos. Are you still on the, I think we, I don't know how that exactly played out

Corey:
Goals for doing daily content and then not doing it. Exactly. Yeah. No, I'm working on trying to create one new piece of content every day in April, but I'm not being too strict about it. So it's not necessarily like a blog post or a YouTube video. It can be like any piece of content. Yeah. But yeah, we did put out a bunch of YouTube short YouTube videos when we were, we actually did make it to WPPI this year, just before all this stuff really broke out. And when we were there together, we recorded like 10 videos, just, you know, two minute tips and put those on YouTube.

Scott:
Right. Yeah. And it's cool. It's cool seeing each of you you know, individually doing, doing the, you know, on camera, doing the videos and nice. It's nice to break it up from the same person all the time, which, you know, excuse me, my, my my own YouTube channel is just me. So it's like I fall into exactly what I'm saying is nice to not do so. But anyway, so with all this content, is there anything that you guys have been talking about potentially doing that, that, that fans of your photos could expect it? A feature from the brand in general?

Corey:
Oh man, we have so many plans. Tell him what jumps out to you. Gosh. we really want to teach people how to utilize WordPress properly. And so I think we're going to plan a series, I don't know if that's going to be podcasts, YouTube videos, blog posts or all, but just how we recommend to use WordPress just to get rid of the common misconceptions that WordPress is hard or WordPress is complicated. So that's, that's one topic we're really wanting to push into a little bit. Yeah. We're actually really excited about WordPress right now. So it's nice being on the WordPress photographers, podcasts because we're going to be talking a lot about WordPress soon. We're talking about using, yeah, we're thinking forward, you know, how, how can we better utilize Gutenberg as it becomes more and more tied into everything more features are available.

Corey:
How can we think about being amp first, potentially with WordPress. In the meantime we're kind of leaning on element tour a bit because it seems like a decent stop gap for now. It's like the, as far as page builders go, it's like the best bad option. I say bad because I just generally would rather not use a page builder. But for now it's what we're using because we do think it's a decent option. So just all of that kind of education around WordPress as a platform and how it compares to other platforms because we still need to talk about for our audience, like show it and Squarespace and how can you make those work or how would you switch from those to work presser, those kinds of topics. So speaking of Gutenberg or the the block editor have you tried block patterns yet?

Corey:
No. Tell me more. So you know how the block editor has reusable blocks, right? You can go in, make a block, save it, and then use it on any page or any post wherever you want. So they now have blocked patterns in beta, which is basically like page templates for what block editor and it's completely beta in. You actually have to install the Gutenberg plugin in order to access it right now. And Justin Tadlock who's one of the, he's been a core developer, he's done a bunch of development on variety of things. He's now a writer for WP Tavern. He just released a plugin that allows anybody to create block patterns and save it and it'll be usable. So that's going to actually be in that, be able to make your own block patterns, will be in court eventually, but right now one developer has made a product to, to do that. So that's one of the many things that I'm very excited for in, in the block editor. But there's, there's other things they're doing, like they're, they're, they're, they're doing mobile and tablet previews which is nice, but in the backend it's all just like Elementor and Devi and all the others, except right now all the blocks don't have

Scott:
Mobile controls in court. So it's kind of funny that they're giving you the preview but not giving you the controls to change font size on phone versus tablet. But yeah, but it's coming along. It's come along. So I am actually curious what, what excites you the most about the new block editor?

Corey:
Gosh Hmm. My thing, I think I'm really excited about the fact that it's built in and it's going to be able to do the majority of things that most people would want to do with an editor like Divi or Elementor. Just by default. I mean it's hopefully more streamlined and more, you know, fits within the UI of WordPress and it's just like all built in. I also like the fact that by default, at least right now, what's included in the block editor is amp compliant. As far as all the testing we've done so far, and that's something that we're, it's like really on our radar in the future.

Scott:
Yeah. And you know, I don't know if you knew this, but the, the header menu and also your widgets and your footer menu, I'll let those are all becoming blocks as well. Nice. So yeah, it's sort of just like how BeaverBuilder and element or have their theme or stuff where you know, the elements become all components of the site. It just, that's, that's how that's the future of WordPress now is, is blocks you have. So yeah. You know and, and for, for people who are using the block editor and want to use the block editor, not a non WordPress style page builder, they, there's, there's hundreds of block editor, page builder plugins, they can add that, that offer more control

Corey:
Over the, the core blocks. We've been playing with atomic blocks and co blocks and a few others like that.

Scott:
Yeah. Yeah. So, so yeah, there's the one that we're recommending an Imagely is cadence just from a code review. And and UI perspective cadence

Corey:
Blocks as a tourist is quite nice. Yeah. One thing I'm really worried about with these like third party blocks is that right now we're in such an early stage with the block editor that so many of the features that are in these third party plugins are going to eventually become part of [inaudible] and then like they start to conflict and it's just, well not always, but at least in some cases in the past I've had like back before you could add columns in the block editor, you added a plugin and now you can add columns and it's like you get a weird UI experience when it's like you want to add columns here or here and it's just messy, you know?

Scott:
Yeah. You get multiple, fortunately both in the block editor and also in a lot of these party plugins you could hide specific blocks. So if you have, let's say code blocks installed and you're using the block, the default of course block editor, then you're going to have to row or column type blocks where you can go to the code blocks, you know, manage visible blocks or whatever they call it. And then you can stop that from showing in the UI. Same thing with cadence and so on. You can just stop it, stop there. I can stop the cadence button from showing it, just use the core button, which has its advantages and disadvantages. Because in some ways, like for example, if I am concerned over the font size of the text and a button or the padding of of a button on mobile, on a mobile phone versus I am 1:00 AM on a desktop, then the core button block is not the way to go right now.

Scott:
But exactly what it's going to get there. It's going to get there in the past two releases at least. Oh yeah, they haven't, there's now a social icon block, so you can do social follows. Even the button block has now Mo you could do multiple buttons in a row and you could do gradient backgrounds on certain blocks. So 5.4 release notes this week. And I was like, this is like all just additions to Gutenberg. That's kind of cool. Yeah. Yeah, that's, that is an Matt Mullenweg actually is the lead on this, on these releases right now. So that's why we're seeing this. That's why we're seeing such a push on, on the block editor. So you know, I'm I'm, I'm glad to hear that you guys are both excited for, for that, for the block editor. Because I am, I think it was necessary and it's a huge push into futurization of WordPress, so I'm excited.

Scott:
Yeah. Yeah. So anything you guys want to share as we close this up? Any final thoughts you want to share, whether it's about your podcast or YouTube channel or anything? What we did just release a free seven day challenge that people have been loving. It's just like really easy. The thing that you asked earlier, like what's one thing you could do right now? Well, it's seven days in a row of that. So I think that'd be a great thing. People could go check out if they're looking for more tips like that. And that's in the, that's in the group, correct. Yeah, it is in the group. But you can just go to fuel your photos.com/challenge and sign up there. Great. So I will make sure I link to that cause I obviously this is going out a month from now so I want to make sure I can still get people access to that.

Scott:
So cool. So fuelyourphotos.com/challenge. I'll link to that in the show notes. So thank you Corey and Dylan for joining me today on this show. Obviously the best place they can find you is fuel your photos.com, but if you want to share anything else where the listeners find more about you guys. Yeah, that's place is probably the Facebook group for now. I think we're pretty active there and it's pretty thriving community. So yeah, check out fuel your photos on Facebook. Totally cool. So you can find the show notes and where to find both guys at imagely.com/podcast/103 don't forget to subscribe to the show on Apple podcasts, Spotify, Pandora, Google play, and wherever you listen to podcasts. Until next time.

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clean no 24:53 Scott Wyden Kivowitz
Episode 102 – High Converting Headshot Photography Websites https://www.imagely.com/podcast/102/ Thu, 23 Apr 2020 10:30:00 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=50579 full 102
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When photographers only focus on one type of photography services it is much easier to create a website that is finely tuned for lead generation and customer conversions.

In this episode, we will discuss recommendations for how headshots photographers can do some sharpening up.

Joke of the day:

The Earth without art is just Eh. 

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Referenced Links:

Shoutout

Very informative podcast! I LOVE this podcast. It’s very informative and provides actionable insights. Highly recommend!

Indianapolis Portrait Photographer

Transcription:

Transcription was done by Rev.com, using their AI (artificial intellegence) generated transcript. The transcript may contain spelling, grammar, and other errors, and is not a substitute for watching the video or listening to the episode.

The earth without art is just, eh. Hi, my name is Scott Wyden Kivowitz. You're listening to the WordPress photography podcast. This is episode one zero two my name is Scott Wyden Kivowitz. I'm your host and the chief community officer here at Imagely. Today I want to share with you what I would suggest for somebody who is exclusively exclusively a headshot photographer, meaning somebody who is not any other genre of photography. I mean, maybe you do full lifestyle brand photos or maybe not. Maybe you do full portrait, but typically your aim is headshots, right? You offer headshots to business people, to actors, to musicians, to speakers, and so on. Well, your website should be finally focused. It should be very, very specific and its goal should be to convert people to hire you for head shots. That should be it goal. Sure. You might have some, a blog where you share some content that is educational and also entertaining to your audience, to the people who might want to hire you.

But the design aspect of your website should be very simple and very straight forward so that there's a fine needle, sharp pinpoint focus, pun intended, in order to get people to see your work and easily hire you. So my suggestion is this first in the header, keep it very simple. Of course your logos at the top. And then in the menu are there three or four items? The menu would have pricing contact and then a book now button. If you're going to have a blog, of course you might want to put a blog up there, but you don't have to, you could put the blog in like let's say a footer menu if you wanted to, but ideally you have at least two menu items and the book now button or three menu items in the book now button, but no more. And then below that you have a beautiful gallery of, of photos and a call to action, a box of some sort.

That's okay. Talks a little bit about you, not too much, just the right amount and a button so people can see your pricing and a button so people can get a quote for a group, you know, group headshots. If you're, let's say going to go to a business and photograph all of the C level employees, then a group quote would be necessary or you're going to a startup and you need to photograph all the employees. A group quote might be necessary. Now maybe below the grid of portraits you might have a little bit of bout you. So you might have a video trailer about yourself, about your photography services a little bit. You ask them, you know, keywords in there for STO, stuff like that. And again, that book now button will be there as well. And then maybe below that you might have some testimonials from clients.

Of course you can make an entire testimonial page. I would not put that in the header menu, but that might be something else you put in a footer menu. But you want testimonials from clients of course. And if you don't have any yet, do some headshots for free in exchange for some good testimonials to get started. If this is your new business, if you're preexisting to sass existing clients for testimonials and then the bottom of course you will have a footer menu and this is good for mobile really more than anything else, but the footer menu might have more things in it like the blog, it might have your testimonials, maybe some other things, maybe some social icon for people to know where to find you on social media. But if we move on to the pricing page, you're going to keep it simple. Again, a very short gallery of images, not too many, right?

Not too little, but not too many, and you're going to have basically two boxes. One box is going to have your pricing and the other box is going to have the booking solution. Now this booking solution won't just be a click here to book. It's going to be the booking solution embedded on that page. So you can either use a WordPress plugin like Amelia, which I'll link to in the show notes, or you can use a Calendly or, or you could use square any software as a service based booking system and embed that onto your website. And of course you can embed that in WordPress in Wix and Weebly and Squarespace or whatever you're doing. You could embed that in on your site, but it is important that your pricing page is just that. It is very straight forward pricing. If you want a good system for pricing and structuring the business around headshots, I I recommend checking out the TNT method.

I will link to that in the show notes and I hope to have Tony who created this method on the show in the future and I can connect it to this episode, which is, which will be really good. So I, that's what I recommend I, we'll link to that method, that course in the show notes. Now on the contact page, it's going to be very straight forward. Again, similar layout to your pricing page, except it's going to be on the left. You'll have sort of your address and phone number and email address. On the right, you'll have the the contact form, right? And then the booking the book. Now page, we'll actually actually go back to your pricing page because that's where you want people to go. But let's say somebody wants a group quote, you're going to have another page, and that could be again, a similar similar layout to your contact page, except it's to get a quote for group headshots.

And the reason why this is important to have a separate page is that you can track who is contacting you just to contact you for whatever reason. And then who is contacting you for a quote specifically. Now, if you're doing a blog, of course you want to make, you're educating your clients, you want to make sure that you're teaching them about preparing for a headshot and what to expect in their head, such shots session and things like that. But you can drip in there some entertaining content, some stories from past clients or things like that. There's no reason why you can't do that. Last but not least, if you're doing testimonials, how you lay that out is completely up to you. There's no set method, but I do recommend keep me a clean. Even if you have two or three columns and you're, you're embedding your Facebook's testimonials or you're, you're, you're just copying and pasting and using a quote blocks that are in the WordPress block editor or you're creating graphics forward, whatever it is, you need to keep that clean because the more testimonials you have, which is good, by the way, the more cluttered it can get.

In fact, one way to break that up is if you have video testimonials, that would be even better because then you could do some text or image testimonials and break it up with some video content. And video content is really good for your brand. It's, it's so engaging for people to view your, your, your, your testimonials from clients in video form. Seeing people, hearing people actually talk about you as a business is really a great conversion boost platform. Oh, a quick shout out to Ryan back Herms from back Herms photography.com Ryan is an Indianapolis portrait photographer and he left a really kind of review for us on Apple podcast. He said, I love this podcast. It's very informative and provides actionable insights. Highly recommend. Thank you Ryan. We really appreciate it. If you would like a shoutout on the podcast just like Ryan, then I have an opportunity for you.

You see, I want to see more reviews for this show. So here is my offer. Leave a review on the podcast platform that you subscribe through. If that podcast platform offers the ability to leave a review. If not, just go to Apple podcasts and leave a review. Leave a wonderful five star review for the show. Then go to imagely.com/podcast/r and complete the form there and what I would do is I will do a shout out for you on one of the future episodes and include a link to your site as a thank you in the show notes, which of course is good for SEO because now you've got a nice backlink to your site from imagely.com all listeners are welcome to take me up on this offer. So that is what I recommend for a headshot website because it's simple and it's straightforward and it will get you bookings and Imagely.

We had been working hard on getting the Imagely sites platform, our hosting platform, relaunched and I'm hoping that I can actually get this template I've been working on for headshot photographers as a preset website design in Imagely sites. So stay tuned. I will hopefully have that for you at some point. But in the meantime, if you have any questions about headshot photography websites, the headshot photography business, if you want to check out the links that I mentioned in this episode, check out the show notes at [inaudible] dot com slash podcast slash one zero two thanks for listening. See you in the next episode.

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clean no 10:09 Scott Wyden Kivowitz
Episode 101 – What to do during downtime in a pandemic https://www.imagely.com/podcast/101/ Thu, 09 Apr 2020 10:40:00 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=50446 101
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With all going on during the COVID-19 pandemic, we thought it would be important to educate you on things you can do when at home, or in the studio during downtime.

What you will hear in this episode will help you get a step ahead when the world goes back to normal and the economy bounces back.

Here is what we discuss

  • Update your site's on-site SEO
  • Create new blog content,
  • Edit some old work you've been wanting to revisit
  • Update or create a new lead magnet
  • Update or create new lead nurturing
  • Update or audit your workflow and business systems
  • Update or create new contracts and agreements (The Law Tog)

Referenced Links:

Transcription:

Transcription was done by Rev.com, using their AI (artificial intellegence) generated transcript. The transcript may contain spelling, grammar, and other errors, and is not a substitute for watching the video or listening to the episode.

Welcome to episode one zero one my name is Scott Wyden Kivowitz and today we are going to talk about this pen demic going on and how it impacts photographers, photography business, your finances in general, your lives in general. Now I'm not going to go into too many details. I'm going to do a quick overview because while we're in this, we're living it so you most likely your photography business has most likely been impacted. You are having clients cancel, you're having events canceled, you're not having the photo sessions that you've had booked because either you have to cancel it or they've been canceled on you and there's so many things that are going on that is costing you money. Whether it's you losing money on these sessions or you having to pay for something that you'd have to pay for before. For example, in my case, my wife is a teacher.

She is still working but she's now going to be doing virtual classes for her students public school by the way at home and she has to do this. Her normal schedule to eight to three or whatever her normal schedule is at school. Now I am here working at Imagely. We are a remote team so I'm at home as well, working normal hours. My daughter has always been in her daycare, her preschool and that is changing because now the, the preschool is closed and everybody's at home. That means that I have to have childcare to now watch two kids, which means I now need to pay for two kids at with at-home childcare for my older daughter and my younger son instead of the one that I would have one I'd be paying for one child typically for at-home childcare so it's going to get expensive. It's going to get expensive because now we have to buy more food, more groceries and we now have to pay from work childcare at home.

We now have to figure out the schedule of how is it going to work between my wife and I both working at home and maybe our childcare doesn't want to come certain days because their children are at home as well, so we'll see. But we are impacted already already we are impacted and it just going to keep getting worse. Now keep in mind, besides from certain things, having to pay more revenue coming in less. There's another issue. Our retirement accounts, our stocks, our 401k is our IRAs, our Roths, they're all going down and down and down and down. It's kind of scary actually. Now this will bounce back. The economy will bounce back after everything is gone, but it will take time. It'll take a far more time for it to bounce back than it did for it to go away. So with that, I want to share what you can do during downtime in a pandemic, like where like we are in right now.

So for one you can update your sites onsite. SEO, this is far easier than offsite SEO, but you can update your sites onsite, SEO internally linking where you need to editing important landing pages and making them more SEO ready, more optimized for search engines. You could add table of contents that are good for schema on Google and being and things like that. You could also go off site and update your Facebook page so it's more optimized. Your your Yelp listing, your Google my business listing. You can do all the on offsite things. He citations that'll help your local rankings. So you come up better in search. These are things that you can do SEO wise to during this downtime to help your business. So when the economy comes back, you are already doing better. Now when you're on your site, you can also start thinking about more blog content.

You know, whether you write the content or you just create quick drafts and come back to a later start brainstorming new blog content. You can also edit some older work, some, some older photos, right? So when I say older work, I mean multiple things. You can edit older photos that are in your catalog that you wanted to revisit that you just haven't had time to do. You won't. You now have time so you could edit older photos. You can also edit older blog posts, go back in your archives to the older blog posts and edit those as well. Now if you have a lead magnet, then go ahead and update that. If this is what gets you, your leads are a lot of your leads update it. Make it more up to date. You now have the time to do so or if you do not have one yet, create one.

If you don't know what a lead magnet is, I recommend checking out my course. More leads, more clients, lead generation and that can be found at my website, Scott, wine.com I will link to that in the show notes. On the same note, if you have a lead nurturing campaign in place, now might be a good time to analyze the stats and update it or if you don't have one in place, again might be a good time to create one. We as businesses have workflows, we have systems for things. What happens when a lead comes in? What do we do to ha what happens when we Mark this person as now? It's an opportunity and then it's a, it's a book job and how do we do the bookings and all this stuff. We have these workflows and systems. If you don't have one, create one.

If you do have one, audit your workflow and systems. See what's working, see what can be adjusted, improved, tweaked, and go ahead and do that. Again, you have the time. The last thing I want to mention that things you can do during this downtime is to update or create new contracts and agreements. If you don't have these already in place, you need some, I recommend the law tog our friend Rachel Brenke, he has tons of contracts. I will link to that in the show notes as well and where you can get some contracts and then fill in the blanks for your own business there. They're amazing contracts that are ready to go and then you could tweak them a further by sending to your attorney and have them you know, fine tuned for your specific location and situation. But otherwise they're pretty general and work for most businesses.

That's all the tips, these little tips that I want to give you, what you can do during the downtime. Now I want to talk, share some. Now I want to share some additional links of, of places that you could go and read more about how or listen to cause I'm more podcasts. About what you could do to improve your business further from during this downtime or things you can do to help your clients during this pandemic. So there's a few links I'm going to include in the show notes. One is to skip cone university, one is to sprout studio there. They create a great basically a database of content that's called first aid and it's fantastic. Then there's a great con, a great article from SLR lounge, and then last Spinelli's again Rachel Brenke. He has a podcast episode talking about some of the legal aspects and things related to this pandemic.

So if you would like to see these links and access all this content, go to imagely.com/podcast/one zero one I hope that will you comment, share how you've been impacted. I know you've been impacted. It's obvious, right? This is something that is an impacting the entire world. Everybody's affected by it, whether we're photographers or not. Okay, so go to go to imagely.com/podcast/one zero one share with us in a comment how you have been impacted, what has been the worst thing and how are you dealing with it now? I hope that you also will share this episode with your colleagues, your friends, your coworkers, because this episode, while this is a WordPress photography podcast, this is for anybody, no matter the business type because what I just shared goes way beyond just photography. And by the way, if you didn't notice, this episode is audio only. We are testing out audio only episodes and we're doing this for a good reason, which maybe I'll talk about at a later time. Until next time. This is Scott Wyden Kivowitz, the chief community officer here at Imagely, and I look forward to talking with you in episode one zero two.

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clean no 9:09 Scott Wyden Kivowitz
Episode 100 – Celebrating Together https://www.imagely.com/podcast/100/ Thu, 26 Mar 2020 13:00:46 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=49809 full 100
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Today we are celebrating 100 episodes of WordPress education, around 3 years of this podcast and of course, we are celebrating WordPress.

At the time of recording this WordPress 5.4 is around the corner. By the time this episode is live, WordPress 5.4 might already be released into the wild.

With 5.4 comes with a new block and a block change in the editor.

  • The new social icon block will make it extremely easy to make social follow buttons and icons for your website.
  • There will be a new buttons block which will allow for multiple buttons in one block with various of the buttons as well.

The latest post block is also getting a major update with additional styling controls and featured image display.

The block editor is also getting a tablet and mobile preview as page builders offer. That isn’t coming in version 5.4, but it’s in the works and it works nicely!

All of these things moves the block editor closer and closer to making alternative page builders less and less needed for easy design.

Here at Imagely, we are very excited about this.  In fact, we are working on a brand new theme framework for our brands which will be recommending the use of the block editor, and even using it for page designs.

We will be recommending a third-party block page builder, called Kadence, and that will remain until the WordPress core editor has enough blocks and settings to warrant not recommending a third-party plugin. The good news is we’ve done excessive code reviews and testing, and it’s by far the best block editor page builder plugin available. Kadence is free (but there is a premium version too), so you can already install it on your site and start using it even before our new theme framework is released.

To further celebrate WordPress, Scott asked a question in his WordPress for Photographer's Facebook group.

What is your favorite part about WordPress?

Here is what a few of the 2100+ members had to say.

  • Craig -  It's free. 😂
  • Angela -  Flexibility
  • Daryl -  Ease of use!
  • Linda - free and lots of options
  • Derek -  Lots of plugins
  • Faatimah -  Easy to use
  • Neil - My favorite part is how easy it is to use for a complete 
  • Adrian -  Is ease of use and flexibility and it's free and The infinite amount of plugins available to do pretty much what you want in a simple way

If you want to join our celebration and share what your favorite part of WordPress is, comment and let us know.

WordPress is already running 35% of the web. Meaning 35% of all websites are running WordPress and that is growing a lot every single year. There are constantly new website platforms that arise that come out of the word work. Some of which are for photographers specifically.

  • ShowIt
  • GoodGallery
  • Google Site
  • Square Site
  • Squarespace
  • Adobe Portfolio
  • Pixieset Sites

There are many website platforms out there, and many of which still require WordPress for some of the capabilities of the website, some of which are built on WordPress, some of which mimic what WordPress can do or at least try to and really soon we will be able to relaunch Imagely Sites and we are so excited for that because that is going to be a game-changer for the photography industry and anybody who has ever said WordPress is difficult or too time-consuming to manage and maintain. We're solving that problem and we're making it very affordable.

We are very excited to see what you are doing with WordPress and we are very excited about WordPress in general and where it is headed.

Transcription:

Transcription was done by Rev.com, using their AI (artificial intellegence) generated transcript. The transcript may contain spelling, grammar, and other errors, and is not a substitute for watching the video or listening to the episode.

Welcome to episode 100 my name is Scott Wyden Kivowitz and today we are celebrating 100 episodes of WordPress education and around three years of this podcast. At the time of recording this WordPress 5.4 is around the corner. By the time this episode is live, WordPress 5.4 might already be here. It might be released into the wild with 5.4 comes to new core blocks. These are blocks that will be in every install of WordPress. The social icon block will make it so easy for you to share your social follow buttons and icon anywhere on your website. There were being new buttons block, which will allow you to have multiple buttons in one block with multiple configurations and variations for each button, but then there's the latest post block, which already exists in WordPress, but it's getting some improvement. It will have a little bit of additional styling end.

The ability to display featured images as well. The block editor is also getting a new tablet and mobile phone preview in the editor. This is something that other page builder plugins already offer and now it's coming to WordPress but this is likely not coming to WordPress 5.4 to probably be in WordPress 5.5 I don't know for sure that one is still sort of being created. Now all of these things move the block editor and WordPress closer and closer to making page builders less important, less needed for your web design. The block editor is getting more powerful. It's fast, it's easy and it's awesome. Now here at image that we are very excited about the block editor and the future of WordPress. In fact, we are working on a brand new theme framework for all of our brands and that we'll be recommending the use of the block editor and even using it for page designs.

We will be recommending a third party page builder plugin for the block editor. It's called cadence and this will remain until the WordPress core block editor has all the blocks and customization controls that the third party page builder plugin for the block editor has. Once the block editor is as robust, that doesn't warrant a third party block editor plugin. We will remove it, but until then we will be recommending cadence. Now the good news is that we have done extensive code review testing and we're using it in real world situations. Cadence is by far the best coated, the fastest and the most robust page builder plugin for the block editor. Now cadence is free and that's the one we will be recommending, but there is a premium version which we won't be supplying, but that's available to anybody who will want it, but because it's free, it means you can already install cadence on your site and get started using it even before our theme framework is complete and that's a beautiful thing.

Now to further celebrate WordPress, I asked in my WordPress for photographers Facebook group, I asked over 2100 people a question, what is your favorite part about WordPress? Here's what a few of those 2100 plus members had to say, Craig said it's free. Angela said flexibility. Darrell said, ease of use. Linda said free and lots of options. Derek said lots of plugins. Fatima said easy to use. Neil said, my favorite part is how easy it is to use for a complete website and Adrian said is the use and flexibility and it's free and the infamous and now amount of plugins available to do pretty much what you want in a simple way. So here at Imagely we are celebrating 100 episodes of this podcast. The podcast is not ending. We're still in the beginning. If there's something you would like to see hear from in the podcast, please just comment at imagely.com/podcast/ 100 I want to hear from you and if you have something you'd like to share about what you love about WordPress, you can also comment with that.

imagely.com/podcast/ 100 now we're press is already running 35% of the web. 35% of all websites are running WordPress and that is growing a lot every single year. There are constantly new website platforms that arise that come out of the word work. Some of which are for photographers specifically, some of which are not in the photo industry has a ton of competition right now. You have show it, you have good gallery, you have pixie set sites, you now have square sites. You even have Google sites connected to Google my business. Even Adobe has their own portfolio plan which is for websites. There are a ton of website platforms out there, many of which still require WordPress for some of the capabilities of the website, some of which are built on WordPress, some of which mimic what WordPress can do or at least try to and really soon, I don't know how soon, but really soon we will be able to relaunch Imagely site and I'm so excited for that because that is going to be a game changer for the photography industry and anybody who has ever said we're pressed is difficult or too time consuming to manage a knowing, to manage to maintain.

We're solving that problem and we're making it very affordable. So if you would like to find out exactly when MC sites relaunches go to imagely.com/sites and you can enter your email address to find out when there's a lot that we have going on at Imagely with this podcast and beyond and we are very excited for what we can do for you. We are very excited to see what you are doing with WordPress and we are very excited about where press in general and where it is headed. Now, please remember this podcast while this called the WordPress photography podcast. It is about more than just WordPress. It is about your online presence, your online marketing, it's even about your offline presence and your offline marketing. We're talking photography business, but we always try to connect it back to your photography website. So I just want to say thank you.

Thank you for sitting through listening, whatever you're doing, running, jogging, biking, whatever it is. However, wherever, whenever you're listening or watching this podcast, thank you for doing it. Thank you for subscribing. Wherever you subscribe and I have one thing to ask. Please leave a review of the podcast in addition to your requests in your comments on, on each episode or for future episodes of review will help other photographers like yourself find the podcast and we want to be able to educate and connect with as many photographers as possible. So please, if you listen on Apple podcasts, if you listen on Spotify or Pandora, Google play, wherever you listen, leave a review. We appreciate it. imagely.com/podcast/100 that is the URL for today's episode. You can comment, you can ask questions whenever you want. You can do it at that URL. I can't wait to see you in episode one Oh one I don't know what we're going to do in one Oh one but we'll see you there.

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clean no 7:55 Scott Wyden Kivowitz
The WordPress Photography Podcast – 2020 Trailer https://www.imagely.com/podcast/trailer/ Fri, 20 Mar 2020 20:01:42 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=50513 trailer
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This is The WordPress Photography Podcast presented by Imagely. My name is Scott Wyden Kivowitz and I am your host and the Chief Community Officer here at Imagely.

This is the podcast for photographers looking to learn and do more with their WordPress photography websites. Conversations tailored to making WordPress more than just a tool and more of a part of your photography business.

With that said, this podcast goes way beyond WordPress. It is marketing, online marketing, photography websites. That is what we celebrate, teach and discuss in every episode.

Click subscribe or follow wherever you listen to podcasts.

Enjoy the show!

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clean no 0:52 Scott Wyden Kivowitz
Episode 99 – 4 Questions For Your Ads https://www.imagely.com/podcast/99/ Thu, 12 Mar 2020 13:00:00 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=49808 99 Hulafrog surveyed a lot of local businesses and found that 80% of local businesses spend money on ads. However, 60% have a limited budget.

That's why we wanted to share some of the advice from Hulafrog, and our own advice, to help you determine where what, why, and how to advertise in various places.

What we discuss:

  • Why advertise?
  • Where should you advertise?
  • When should you advertise?
  • How much should you spend?

Transcription:

Transcription was done by Rev.com, using their AI (artificial intellegence) generated transcript. The transcript may contain spelling, grammar, and other errors, and is not a substitute for watching the video or listening to the episode.

Welcome to episode 99 my name is Scott Wyden Kivowitz and today I want to talk about Facebook ads for photographers and how to really figure out where to advertise. Hula frog recently did a poll about ads and they found that 80% of local businesses that they polled are advertising but just shy of 60% of these businesses are limited on their budget. So is it a bad choice to advertise our for CIF photographers even bother advertising when really a lot of the business will come from the word of mouth that they find on Facebook and Facebook groups. Well, this is where asking a few questions comes into play and really knowing your target market, knowing your audience, why are you going to advertise? What is your goal for advertising? Why are you putting money into finding clients? Why are you doing it? Do you have an end goal?

What is your goal? Tell me. Go to the show notes at imagely.com/podcast/ 99 and share your goal for advertising. Where are you advertising or where do you want to advertise? You see, here's the thing, because if you are a B to C photographer, then Facebook might be the perfect place and the only place maybe then they're in Google might be the only places that you want to advertise. But do you, if you are a B to B person, maybe you want to advertise on LinkedIn and Google. If your target market are moms and your targeted market are maybe makeup artists, hairdressers, maybe it is the moms, right? Mt. Moms, right? That are, they're using Pinterest. So maybe you need to be on Pinterest and Facebook. So just like anything with social media, anything where you just, should you be on LinkedIn if your target market are not on LinkedIn?

Well that's the question you should be asking yourself for advertising as well. When, when should you advertise? Should you be doing it on holidays? Should it be, do you'd be doing specific holiday ads? Should you be doing it at midnight or are your target market that demographic sleeping at midnight and then what is your budget? Because if you have a budget of $200 and it costs you $200 to get a client, and that $200 is all you get from that client, then you're breaking even. You're not making money on that. But if it costs you $25 of that $200 budget to get the client and that client is paying you $600, then of course that ad was worth it. So you have to figure that stuff out first. So I encourage you to ask yourself these questions, ask yourself all these questions and write them down and figure out exactly where, what, when, how, all of these things are they worth it for you to advertise.

Now I will say the advertising is worth it. It is worth it for most businesses, but it may not be worth it for new photography businesses. But then again, maybe it is, you need to figure that out for yourself. I can't give you the answer to that, but what I can do is help you figure it out by instructing you to ask yourself those questions. This was 99 episode 100 is coming up. I don't know what we're going to do for episode 100 I'm hoping to do something special. I really don't know. Thank you for listening. Thank you for watching. If you're watching this episode, you can check out the show notes at [inaudible] dot com slash podcast slash 99 be sure to comment and let me know why you are advertising what your goal is for those ads. See you in episode 100.

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clean no 4:06 Scott Wyden Kivowitz
Episode 98 – Photoshop and your website with Aaron Nace https://www.imagely.com/podcast/98/ Thu, 27 Feb 2020 14:00:00 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=49796 full 98 clean no 30:54 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 97 – Develop and Focus Your Photo Business with Alex Vita https://www.imagely.com/podcast/97/ Thu, 13 Feb 2020 14:00:00 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=49215 97 clean no 30:58 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 96 – Branding yourself then starting over years later with Jason Groupp https://www.imagely.com/podcast/96/ Thu, 30 Jan 2020 14:00:10 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=49338 full 96 clean no 44:01 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 95 – Swipe Up Without 10,000 Instagram Followers https://www.imagely.com/podcast/95/ Thu, 16 Jan 2020 14:00:00 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=49098 full 95 clean no 7:54 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 94 – Focus on Local with Christine Tremoulet https://www.imagely.com/podcast/94/ Thu, 02 Jan 2020 14:00:00 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=48184 full 94 clean no 41:20 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 93 – Time-Saving Strategic Instagram Tools https://www.imagely.com/podcast/93/ Thu, 19 Dec 2019 14:00:32 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=48065 93 clean no 19:51 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 92 – Making it happen on Instagram with Devin Robinson https://www.imagely.com/podcast/92/ Thu, 05 Dec 2019 14:00:00 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=47917 full 92 clean no 40:04 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 91 – What Your Photography Business Needs https://www.imagely.com/podcast/91/ Thu, 14 Nov 2019 14:00:00 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=47416 full 91 clean no 7:57 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 90 – Automated Print Lab Fulfillment in WordPress https://www.imagely.com/podcast/90/ Thu, 31 Oct 2019 12:00:00 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=46423 full 90 clean no 4:06 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 89 – Too Much WordPress Stuff? https://www.imagely.com/podcast/89/ Thu, 17 Oct 2019 12:00:00 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=46241 89 clean no 18:25 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 88 – How Fast Is Your Photography Site? https://www.imagely.com/podcast/88/ Thu, 03 Oct 2019 13:00:36 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=46052 full 88 clean no 10:32 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 87 – Finances in Photography Business with Eric Rosenberg https://www.imagely.com/podcast/87/ Thu, 19 Sep 2019 13:00:17 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=46049 full 87 clean no 40:52 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 86 – How Chuck Norris Hired Me with Kylee Ann Maughan https://www.imagely.com/podcast/86/ Thu, 05 Sep 2019 12:00:54 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=43822 full 86 clean no 30:59 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 85 – Closing Out Season 3 https://www.imagely.com/podcast/85/ Wed, 03 Jul 2019 10:45:00 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=44471 full 85 clean no 4:19 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 84 – Do Good, Win $5,000 https://www.imagely.com/podcast/84/ Thu, 20 Jun 2019 14:00:00 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=44470 full 84 clean no 4:59 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 83 – Quick Saving Drafts & Reusable Blocks https://www.imagely.com/podcast/83/ Thu, 06 Jun 2019 13:10:00 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=43296 83 clean no 4:56 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 82 – The Perfect Google My Business Post https://www.imagely.com/podcast/82/ Thu, 23 May 2019 13:00:00 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=43267 clean no 4:56 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 81 – GDPR Outside of Europe https://www.imagely.com/podcast/81/ Thu, 09 May 2019 13:30:30 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=43198 full 81 clean no 4:12 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 80 – The Travel & Tour Photography Business with Kevin Wenning https://www.imagely.com/podcast/80/ Thu, 25 Apr 2019 10:50:00 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=42946 80 clean no 35:16 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 79 – Changing Categories (and Tags) in Bulk https://www.imagely.com/podcast/79/ Thu, 11 Apr 2019 11:30:00 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=42912 full 79 clean no 4:25 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 78 – Sensual Photos Dreamy Site with Molly Marie Keyser https://www.imagely.com/podcast/78/ Thu, 28 Mar 2019 12:40:00 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=42841 full 78 clean no 30:19 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 77 – Block Editor Workflow Tips https://www.imagely.com/podcast/77/ Thu, 14 Mar 2019 13:00:00 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=42661 77 clean no 8:30 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 76 – Branding Your Photography Business with Keith Stoeckeler https://www.imagely.com/podcast/76/ Thu, 28 Feb 2019 14:00:36 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=42633 76 clean no 28:26 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 75 – Keyboard Shortcuts For Your WordPress Workflow https://www.imagely.com/podcast/75/ Thu, 14 Feb 2019 14:00:29 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=32284 clean no 4:08 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 74 – Diagnosing Broken Previews in WordPress https://www.imagely.com/podcast/74/ Thu, 31 Jan 2019 14:00:00 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=40438 full 74 clean no 4:27 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 73 – Massive Brand Shift w/ Mike Allebach https://www.imagely.com/podcast/73/ Thu, 17 Jan 2019 14:00:00 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=40439 full 73 clean no 35:34 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 72 – What’s In Store For 2019? https://www.imagely.com/podcast/72/ Thu, 03 Jan 2019 14:50:00 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=40440 full 72 clean no 13:45 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 71 – Sticky Clients, Like Glue w/ Nate Grahek https://www.imagely.com/podcast/71/ Thu, 20 Dec 2018 14:00:00 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=40441 full 71 clean no 59:28 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 70 – Install Gutenberg Right Now https://www.imagely.com/podcast/70/ Thu, 06 Dec 2018 13:00:00 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=40442 full 70 clean no 8:52 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 69 – Being Thankful and Thinking About 2019 https://www.imagely.com/podcast/69/ Wed, 21 Nov 2018 15:00:00 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=40443 full 69 clean no 4:06 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 68 – Making Client Onboarding Awesome w/ Latoya Dixon Smith https://www.imagely.com/podcast/68/ Thu, 08 Nov 2018 12:00:00 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=40444 full 68 clean no 34:32 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 67 – This Is Season 3 https://www.imagely.com/podcast/67/ Thu, 25 Oct 2018 14:00:50 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=40437 full 67 clean no 5:45 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 66 – Personal Brand Photography w/ Jamie Swanson https://www.imagely.com/podcast/66/ Thu, 16 Aug 2018 11:30:00 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=39588 full 66 clean no 39:20 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 65 – Optins & Mobile SEO https://www.imagely.com/podcast/65/ Thu, 02 Aug 2018 14:00:06 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=31832 full 65 clean no 4:05 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 64 – Outsourcing Blogging & Newsletters w/ Beth Teutschmann https://www.imagely.com/podcast/64/ Thu, 19 Jul 2018 13:00:38 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=38693 full 64 clean no 39:30 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 63 – SEO Bootcamp for Photographers w/ Brandon Hopper https://www.imagely.com/podcast/63/ Thu, 05 Jul 2018 13:00:09 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=39584 full 63 clean no 16:14 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 62 – Is Facebook Sharing The Wrong Image? https://www.imagely.com/podcast/62/ Thu, 21 Jun 2018 13:00:10 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=39585 full 62 clean no 8:32 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 61 – Important Yoast SEO Patch for a Ranking Bug https://www.imagely.com/podcast/61/ Thu, 07 Jun 2018 13:00:11 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=39586 61 clean no 8:53 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 60 – Celebrating the WordPress 15th Anniversary w/ Christine Tremoulet https://www.imagely.com/podcast/60/ Thu, 24 May 2018 13:00:14 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=39587 full 60 clean no 25:18 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 59 – A Rock And A Hard Place https://www.imagely.com/podcast/59/ Thu, 10 May 2018 13:20:34 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=38692 full 59 clean no 6:19 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 58 – Nurturing With Personalized Videos w/ Julie Christie https://www.imagely.com/podcast/58/ Thu, 26 Apr 2018 13:00:31 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=38691 full 58 clean no 37:15 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 57 – Sell With Your Photography Website w/ The Blumes https://www.imagely.com/podcast/57/ Thu, 12 Apr 2018 13:00:29 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=38690 full 57 clean no 39:38 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 56 – Virtual In-Person Sales w/ Chris Scott https://www.imagely.com/podcast/56/ Thu, 29 Mar 2018 12:00:37 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=38686 full 56 clean no 42:58 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 55 – A WordPress Customizer Productivity Tip https://www.imagely.com/podcast/55/ Thu, 15 Mar 2018 13:00:46 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=31489 full 55 clean no 2:28 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 54 – Blogging Advice for Photographers w/ Esther de Boer https://www.imagely.com/podcast/54/ Thu, 01 Mar 2018 14:00:42 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=38688 full 54 clean no 33:54 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 53 – You Need An Email List https://www.imagely.com/podcast/53/ Thu, 15 Feb 2018 14:00:45 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=38689 full 53 clean no 4:22 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 52 – Image Optimization for Site Speed https://www.imagely.com/podcast/52/ Thu, 01 Feb 2018 14:00:58 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=38685 full 52 clean no 14:31 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 51 – Is Content The Word of 2018? w/ Kim Doyal https://www.imagely.com/podcast/51/ Thu, 18 Jan 2018 13:00:43 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=38598 full 51 clean no 42:47 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 50 – Don’t Drop The Ball https://www.imagely.com/podcast/50/ Thu, 04 Jan 2018 12:00:11 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=38488 full 50 clean no 2:15 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 49 – Automating Lead & Client Nurturing w/ Mailchimp https://www.imagely.com/podcast/49/ Thu, 14 Dec 2017 12:00:56 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=38396 full 49 clean no 12:33 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 48 – Street Photography Website Essentials w/ Valerie Jardin https://www.imagely.com/podcast/48/ Thu, 30 Nov 2017 12:00:58 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=38273 full 48 clean no 33:17 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 47 – Elementor’s Blank Canvas Template https://www.imagely.com/podcast/47/ Thu, 16 Nov 2017 12:00:00 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=38084 full 47 clean no 3:03 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 46 – Know Your Audience w/ Ugo Cei https://www.imagely.com/podcast/46/ Thu, 02 Nov 2017 11:00:35 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=38022 full 46 clean no 35:17 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 45 – Why photographers should use push notifications https://www.imagely.com/podcast/45/ Thu, 19 Oct 2017 11:00:46 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=31464 45 clean no 4:43 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 44 – One Stop Shop for Support & Maintenance w/ Brandon Hopper https://www.imagely.com/podcast/44/ Thu, 05 Oct 2017 11:00:21 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=37606 44 clean no 27:04 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 43 – Finding Content Ideas Through Inspiration w/ Marc Silber https://www.imagely.com/podcast/43/ Thu, 21 Sep 2017 11:00:34 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=37568 43 clean no 40:34 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 42 – Live from Out of Chicago Photography Conference w/ Charlie Clemmer https://www.imagely.com/podcast/42/ Thu, 07 Sep 2017 11:00:29 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=37401 42 clean no 20:45 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 41 – The Future & Feedback https://www.imagely.com/podcast/41/ Thu, 01 Jun 2017 11:00:26 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=36926 41 clean no 10:28 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 40 – WordPress Photography Q&A Volume 4 https://www.imagely.com/podcast/40/ Thu, 18 May 2017 11:00:56 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=36117 40 clean no 19:01 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 39 – Expectations & Consistency In Your Branding w/ Bryan Caporicci https://www.imagely.com/podcast/39/ Thu, 04 May 2017 11:00:52 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=36116 39 clean no 37:58 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 38 – Engaging Video for your Photography Website w/ Daniel Usenko https://www.imagely.com/podcast/38/ Thu, 20 Apr 2017 11:00:50 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=36115 38 clean no 39:21 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 37 – Marketing Evolves So Evolve With It w/ Rosh Sillars https://www.imagely.com/podcast/37/ Thu, 06 Apr 2017 11:00:15 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=36049 37 clean no 35:42 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 36 – The Importance of Branding & Consistency w/ Lena Hyde https://www.imagely.com/podcast/36/ Thu, 23 Mar 2017 11:00:27 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=35163 36 clean no 34:07 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 35 – Why CoSchedule should be installed on every photography website https://www.imagely.com/podcast/35/ Thu, 09 Mar 2017 12:00:45 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=31463 35 clean no 5:05 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 34 – ShootDotEdit Acquires Fotoskribe, and What It Means for Photographers https://www.imagely.com/podcast/34/ Thu, 23 Feb 2017 12:00:00 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=32152 34 clean no 47:59 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 33 – WordPress Misconceptions & Confusions https://www.imagely.com/podcast/33/ Thu, 02 Feb 2017 12:00:20 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=34432 33 clean no 37:34 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 32 – Photography SEO in 2017 w/ Corey Potter https://www.imagely.com/podcast/32/ Thu, 19 Jan 2017 12:00:00 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=34430 32 clean no 56:03 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 31 – Photography Business Resources for 2017 https://www.imagely.com/podcast/31/ Thu, 05 Jan 2017 12:00:19 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=34431 31 clean no 48:38 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 30 – WordPress Photography Q&A Volume 3 https://www.imagely.com/podcast/30/ Thu, 22 Dec 2016 12:00:03 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=32153 31 clean no 53:50 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 29 – Content Management For Your Photos w/ Angela Bowman https://www.imagely.com/podcast/29/ Thu, 08 Dec 2016 12:00:20 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=32151 29 clean no 57:14 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 28 – Do The Work First w/ Seshu https://www.imagely.com/podcast/28/ Thu, 24 Nov 2016 12:00:31 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=32150 28 clean no 56:10 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 27 – Your Future Self Will Thank You w/ Twyla Lapointe https://www.imagely.com/podcast/27/ Thu, 10 Nov 2016 12:00:56 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=31949 27 clean no 54:14 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 26 – Outsourcing Website Tasks In Your Photo Business w/ Chris Aram https://www.imagely.com/podcast/26/ Thu, 27 Oct 2016 11:00:05 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=31917 26 clean no 42:32 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 25 – How to find content to blog about https://www.imagely.com/podcast/25/ Thu, 13 Oct 2016 11:00:46 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=31462 25 clean no 2:33 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 24 – Start Slow To Build The Skill w/ Nathan Ellering of CoSchedule https://www.imagely.com/podcast/24/ Thu, 29 Sep 2016 11:00:27 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=31470 24 clean no 49:13 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 23 – Add A Narrative To The Image w/ Don Komarechka https://www.imagely.com/podcast/23/ Thu, 15 Sep 2016 11:00:13 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=29844 23 clean no 48:15 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 22 – Remove Business Paralysis, Be Persistent, Be Unique & Work Hard w/ Jasser Abu-Giemi https://www.imagely.com/podcast/22/ Thu, 01 Sep 2016 11:00:50 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=29843 22 clean no 45:51 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 21 – Keep Them Coming Back To Your Site w/ Nancy Nardi https://www.imagely.com/podcast/21/ Thu, 18 Aug 2016 11:00:24 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=29641 21 clean no 43:01 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 20 – WordPress Photography Q&A Volume 2 https://www.imagely.com/podcast/20/ Thu, 04 Aug 2016 11:00:29 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=29311 20 clean no 55:09 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 19 – Building A Photography Resource & Community w/ A.D. Wheeler https://www.imagely.com/podcast/19/ Thu, 21 Jul 2016 11:00:53 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=28791 19 clean no 56:44 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 18 – Some Things Are Simpler With Page Builders w/ Robby McCullough https://www.imagely.com/podcast/18/ Thu, 07 Jul 2016 11:00:22 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=28351 18 clean no 57:15 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 17 – Outsourcing, Work Life Balance & The 3 To 1 w/ Rachel Brenke https://www.imagely.com/podcast/17/ Thu, 23 Jun 2016 11:00:59 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=28046 17 clean no 46:00 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 16 – Don’t Be Lackadaisical About Your Security w/ Brian Matiash https://www.imagely.com/podcast/16/ Thu, 09 Jun 2016 11:00:51 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=28045 16 clean no 59:29 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 15 – Stop Slowing Down Your Site With Huge Images, Or Too Many w/ Mark Allen https://www.imagely.com/podcast/15/ Thu, 26 May 2016 11:00:10 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=27730 15 clean no 47:45 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 14 – Think About Your Content First w/ Aaron Hockley https://www.imagely.com/podcast/14/ Thu, 12 May 2016 11:00:00 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=27673 14 clean no 50:50 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 13 – Goodbye Squarespace Hello WordPress w/ Anna Sawin https://www.imagely.com/podcast/13/ Thu, 28 Apr 2016 11:00:26 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=27672 13 clean no 47:56 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 12 – Be A Meticulous Entrepreneur w/ Colby Brown https://www.imagely.com/podcast/12/ Thu, 14 Apr 2016 11:00:07 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=27416 12 clean no 45:05 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 11 – Content That Travels With You w/ Andrew Funderburg https://www.imagely.com/podcast/11/ Thu, 31 Mar 2016 11:00:44 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=26189 11 clean no 47:04 Scott Wyden Kivowitz Episode 10 – WordPress Photography Q&A Volume 1 https://www.imagely.com/podcast/10/ Thu, 17 Mar 2016 11:00:57 +0000 Scott Wyden Kivowitz https://www.imagely.com/?post_type=podcast&p=22681 10 clean no 50:57 Scott Wyden Kivowitz